The D7100 seemingly comes with substantially upgraded innards, with 4 features standing out: The new sophisticated 51-point (15 cross-type) Autofocus system, employing the same focusing and tracking algorithms as the much more expensive D4. The ditching of the anti-aliasing filter, allowing the D7100 to join the ever growing 'no-filter' club, together with the Nikon D800E, Pentax K-5IIs et al. Another stand out feature is the new 1.3x cropping mode that extends the reach of lenses, and spreads out the AF points to the very edges of the frame. For example, the full frame 80-400mm now becomes a 160-800mm lens on the D7100. Couple this with a high 7 fps speed, and you've got yourselves a wildlife/soccer mom/paparazzi dream.

Nikon D7100 in-depth review by DPreview "...if you don't have a compelling reason to shoot with a full frame DSLR, the APS-C D7100 offers a largely similar shooting experience"

"The D7100 delivers outstanding image quality and detail rendition at low ISOs in both JPEG and Raw mode. Noise does start to become visible at the pixel level even at moderate ISO sensitivities, but is kept well under control given the pixel density of its 24MP APS-C sensor. While not a surprise, it is worth pointing out that if you're after the very best that this sensor can deliver, you'll not be well-served by the 18-105mm kit zoom. In both our studio and real-world shooting, we've found noticeably better results with Nikon's high-end primes and fast zoom lenses.

While the camera's video specs are impressive, its video output is a bit softer than we'd like. If you want to record at 1080 50i or 60i, keep in mind that this is only possible after you've set the camera to its 1.3x crop mode. Unfortunately, using this crop mode results in output that is upsampled to 1920 x 1080, making this mode of little use for even amateur videographers.

The Nikon D7100 rounds out Nikon's recently revamped lineup of enthusiast-targeted DSLRs. It may sit below the full frame D800 and D600 in price, but . . . read more

Camera labs revewed the Nikon D7100 "The Nikon D7100 is a worthy successor to the D7000 and a sufficiently capable camera to fill the vacancy at the top end of Nikon's DX range"

"Perhaps understandably, a lot of the attention it has received since its launch has focused on its absent optical low-pass filter, with inflated expectations of a resultant boost in sharpness and definition. It now looks like any resulting increase in quality over the company's other 24 Megapixel DX bodies is at best, marginal, and many will no doubt be disappointed by that. But don't lose sight of the fact that OLPF or not, the D7100's sensor produces superb quality 24 Megapixel images; it's just that they're really close to what the cheaper D5200 delivers.

Where it matters to advanced enthusiast and semi-pro users though, the D7100 delivers, with enhancements to build quality and handling, more capable AF and improved continuous shooting, deeper bracketing, a bigger screen and new shooting modes including HDR and effects filters. There's also something to tempt videographers, with new movie modes, built-in stero mics and a headphone socket.

. . . read more

Nikon D7100 review at NPhoto: "Capable of producing superb images with lots of detail and natural colour, but its worth keeping an eye on the image histogram view though as the Matrix Metering doesn’t always do what you expect."

Angela Nicholson reviews Nikon's latest foray into the no-low-pass filter territory, the brand new, D7100:

"Like the Nikon D3200 and D5200, the D7100 has a 24MP sensor, but Nikon has left off the low-pass filter.

Low-pass or anti-aliasing filters are usually put over a camera’s sensor to reduce the risk of moiré interference occurring when photographing subjects with fine patterning that is close to the camera’s resolution limit. The downside of using them is that the image is softened and needs sharpening post capture.

So does omitting the filter from the sensor make any difference to the images? Our tests indicate that it does. At the lower sensitivity settings the D7100 can’t resolve any more detail than the D3200 or D5200, but the images look a little sharper straight from the camera."

Nikon D7100 tested by the DXO Mark "A standout among APS-C shooters that holds its own against full-frame competitors"

Nikon's latest and more featured packed APS-C camera, the D7100 replaced the successfully D7000 adding more resolution, as well as the "advantage" of not having an antialiasing filter. At first there was concerns about the number of megapixels as well as the absence of the antialiasing filter. The DXO testing reveals class leading performance not only to the APS-C size DSLR's but some interesting results compared with the newest Full frame size Cameras.

"Although the new Nikon D7100 looks fairly similar to its predecessor (the popular Nikon D7000), Nikon has made some significant changes under the hood that belie the surface similarity. The D7100 not only includes a higher-resolution CMOS sensor, but even more significantly, the company chose to use a sensor without an anti-alias filter for the first time on a non-full-frame DSLR. While this should enable better sharpness and resolution, it may also result in more moiré patterns in some images."

Nikon D7100 Front View

Description by Nikon:

Nikon D7100 unveiled, another one that skips the optical low-pass filter.

The D7100 seemingly comes with substantially upgraded innards, with 4 features standing out: The new sophisticated 51-point (15 cross-type) Autofocus system, employing the same focusing and tracking algorithms as the much more expensive D4.  The ditching of the anti-aliasing filter, allowing the D7100 to join the ever growing 'no-filter' club, together with the Nikon D800E, Pentax K-5IIs et al. Another stand out feature is the new 1.3x cropping mode that extends the reach of lenses, and spreads out the AF points to the very edges of the frame. For example, the full frame 80-400mm now becomes a 160-800mm lens on the D7100. Couple this with a high 7 fps speed, and you've got yourselves a wildlife/soccer mom/paparazzi dream. . . . read more

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