A simple way to improve your OM-D's FL-LM2 or FL-LM1 mini flash, by Henavs at the Club Snap forum.

Ok, photographers of all levels have been doing variations of this theme for as long as I can remember, so this is just a reminder for anyone less antique than me. Club Snap furum user Henavs has made this nice little tutorial, complete with a with/without bounce card shot:

"The more reflective the surface, the less loss of light. I use glossy photo paper on this, it can be improved with mirror (as dereth mentioned below) or gold/silver reflector. You can make the bounce card any size you want & keep the card in your pocket or bag. For me, I just keep it small & stick it on top of the flash when not in use, easier to store."

Olympus releases OM-D/EM-5 firmware version 1.6, doesn't fix much, and adds nothing new.

To be fair, most of the shortcomings of the E-M5 cannot be fixed with a firmware upgrade, except maybe for the custom user settings implementation.  Firmware version 1.6 only addresses these issues:

1.The highlight and shadow control function was modified so the exposure settings are applied correctly at ISO 2000 or higher.
2.The issue that occasionally prevented operations during long exposures was resolved.

You need the Olympus Camera Updater in order to upgrade your firmware to version 1.6

The Panasonic GH3 Gets DXO MARK'ed, comes out as very similar to the Olympus E-M5, do they use the same sensor?

"The Panasonic Lumix DMC GH3 is a very good camera, among the best tested by DxO Mark in this format. It is small and light and will make an excellent camera to travel with and fulfils all of the requirements that a serious enthusiast is likely to have. However, it is pricey for a hybrid and it has competition from several directions. The Olympus is even smaller and lighter and scores slightly higher but it does lack a viewfinder. For a similar price you could be buying either the Pentax K 01 or the K-5 IIs, both of which have scores consistently higher than the Lumix but obviously with the overhead of a bulkier and heavier piece of . . . read more

Happy 1st Birthday Anniversary, Olympus OM-D/E-M5!

Oh how time flies. A full year-and a day, has passed since the official revelation of the E-M5, a camera that came at a very crucial moment in Olympus history, the company still shaking by the aftermath of the financial misbehaving of its board. This little cam took the limelight away from all that, and has carried it far and away: The E-M5 must be the most awarded and decorated digital camera so far, having received a 'camera of the year' award by most major photography sites worth their affiliate links, and of course, by me.

Here is my 'best camera' definition: It is the one you can carry with you to as many places as possible, under as many environmental conditions as possible, and can deliver reliable output, day or night. And by that definition the Olympus E-M5 is the best camera that I've ever had, and I've been using digital cameras since 2001. I've been through almost all of Canon's EOS range, up to and including the 7D and the 5D Mark III, an untold number of prosumer cameras, both pocket sized and superzooms, and a couple of earlier micro 4/3 models from Olympus and Panasonic, even some NExes. . . . read more

Olympus E-M5 review by Spike Tennyson at M43 Info

A bit late? No, Spike posts his review on the exact day the OM-D was announced a year ago, so let's call it a birthday review. Spike previous camera is a Panasonic GX1, and he compares these two a lot:

"Those of us who have been shooting with M43 cameras for a while have always known how good they are, and we know how little you lose and how much you gain when you give up your DSLR for something smaller. But it has taken the E-M5 for the rest of the world to finally take notice and recognise the worth of these mirrorless cameras. Now I have an E-M5 in my hands, I understand why. . . . read more

Fujifilm X-E1 Versus X100 comparison at TR, and the winner is...the Olympus E-M5?

Well, that was distracting, but the darn OM-D keeps turning up in places it shouldn't. This time its in Tech Radar's Fujifilm 2 flagship cameras comparison, and their place among the top competitors, the NEX7, the GH3, and the E-M5. Things look pretty normal until the Raw performance comparison charts. Also noteworthy, the rather unimpressive results given by the GH3:                                                                  

"The signal to noise ratios of the TIFF images (after conversion from raw) from the Fuji X-E1 don't compare quite as well for signal to noise ratio as the JPEGs did, coming behind the Olympus OM-D at all sensitivities and below the Panasonic GH3 at ISO 200 and 400. The Fuji X-E1 beats the Panasonic at higher sensitivities though, and beats the Sony NEX-7 andFuji X-Pro1." . . . read more

Olympus OM-D EM-5 epic review by Nasim Mansurov: Without a doubt, the Olympus OM-D E-M5 is the best mirrorless camera on the market today. I just wish I checked it out earlier.

And I wish i had discovered this post by Nasim earlier. As far as reviews of the EM-5 go, this is one of the top 3 there is, the other two being Thom Hogan's recent essay and of course Richard Butler's technical at DPReview. Nasims reviews strike the perfect balance between lyrical and tehnical, and just for this, we forgive him for making fool predictions :)

"Until I came across the Olympus OM-D E-M5. From the day I started using the OM-D E-M5, I just fell in love with it. Everything just felt right about it – excellent image quality, incredibly fast autofocus, wide lens selection, superior ergonomics with a boatload of customization options. Suddenly, it just felt like the camera I had been wanting to own and use all these years. My only doubt was the smaller sensor size – for a while I thought that I would go with a

. . . read more

Thom Hogan finally finishes his Olympus E-M5 review: I trust it for the type of shooting i normally do.

I can really see why it took him so long. There are no charts here, no Iso trains, no technical sections, heck not even images (except for one), but in this review they are not needed. It is evident that Thom has poured a lot of labour into this, and reading it will give a better picture of what the Olympus E-M5 really is, better than any review out there.

"This was a tough review to write. Indeed, it's taken me longer than it should have because there have been a series of small things that I wanted to be sure of before committing to them on the site. On the one hand, it was clear to me that I had started carrying the E-M5 instead of a DX DSLR when I needed to go light and small. On the other hand, those menus and options can be frustratingly dense and confusing. Was I perhaps just favoring the light and small and putting up with the complexity? It really takes time to answer that question, and thus the long germination of this review. . . . read more

Panasonic Lumix G X Vario 35-100mm f/2.8 ASPH POWER O.I.S Lens review by Ivo Freriks at Camera Stuff Review: Given the optical performances and the high quality of construction, this lens is certainly not expensive.

The Lens was tested with  Olympus E-M5 and Panasonic GH3 body. 

"The Panasonic 35-100 mm delivers sharp images across all focal lengths from full aperture to aperture 8. Above that, the resolution decreases as a result of diffraction. This is the best micro-43 zoom lens we have reviewed to date, with the Panasonic 12-35 mm yielding more or less equivalent results (but at a different focal length range). In the graph with Imatest values at the right below, you can see how beautifully high and constant the resolution is. The images are measurably sharper in the center, with the maximum being located at aperture 4 to 5.6. Nevertheless, with the naked eye, the difference in resolution between the corners and the center is not visible." . . . read more

Sigma 19mm f/2.8 EX DN lens review by Jordan Steel at Admiring Light: I should't like it, but I love it.

Bokeh from the Sigma 19mm EX DN lens is relatively neutral.

The lens was tested with an Olympus E-M5 camera, and Kudos to Jordan for not stripping the EXIF information from the images.

"The Sigma 19mm is a lens that frankly, I shouldn’t like. I’ve been using pretty much nothing but high end lenses for the past 6 years, and generally a budget lens like this wouldn’t even ping my radar. Then there’s that somewhat odd focal length, it’s relatively slow aperture and unremarkable size . But the fact of the matter is, I do like this lens. Sigma managed to make an affordable lens that is well built with a fast and silent autofocus motor. They then made it . . . read more

The Photography Blog's compact system camera of the year award goes to the Olympus OM-D E-M5

Olympus E-m5 the most voted best compact system camera of 2012

I Wonder if Olympus has a big enough trophy case for the awards collected by the E-M5 :)

"The OM-D E-M5 is the best Olympus compact system camera to date, and also a strong contender for best compact system camera full stop. It delivers a compelling mix of classic looks, excellent image quality, an extensive feature set and immediate responsiveness, with the camera so well designed that it rarely gets in the way of the creative process. The E-M5 may hark back to a bygone era, but it’s definitely bang-up-to-date in all the places that count.”

Olympus OM-D E-M5 long term review by Scott Bourne at Photo Focus: The Olympus is not a perfect camera. Shock. Of course there is no such thing. But for me, (not necessarily you) it is as close as I’ll come right now.

Since using the EM-5 I haven’t been bothered by a single cop-wannabe security gu

"When it comes to the intangibles like general camera support, accessories, education, repair, spare parts, the Olympus/Panasonic MFT cameras come up short. But not by much. Pros cannot count on anything like CPS or NPS from Panasonic or Olympus. That means repair times might run into weeks or even months. There aren’t as many classes, third-party books, etc. for MFT shooters. Accessories for the MFT cameras aren’t quite as abundant as they are for DSLRs but this is getting to be a horserace. There are more and more MFT accessories becoming available and I am quite happy with the . . . read more

Mike Johnston (The Online Photographer) finally, FINALLY, picks his camera of the year, shows that this year almost everybody agrees on which camera it should be.

No, we won't spoil it, coz we at Estiasis love Mike, and we want youto head over to TOP and read his award rant that circles mostly around American football:

""Best of" awards have always annoyed me because of a principle I'm highly aware of, yet which doesn't, to my knowledge, have a name. Namely: the closer to equal two things are, the less important it should be to rank them, but the more important it seems to be to humans to do so. So if two DACs (digital to analogue converters) are almost indistinguishable . . . read more

Thom Hogan's Serious camera of the year award goes to the Olympus E-M5, Thom explains why it was hard to choose between the OM-D and the Fuji X-E1.

Olympus E-M5, voted as serious camera of the year by Thom Hogan.

This is a Sans Mirror award, so, fans of mirrors and smoke please look elsewhere. Thom's nominees include the Sony NEX-6, the Panasonic GH3, and the Fujifilm X-E1:

"The E-M5's image quality is good enough that it basically replaced my Nikon D7000 (DX DSLR) as my hike-deep-into-the-backcountry camera. Why? Because I gave up nothing terribly significant in the sensor, but lost weight and size while gaining some exceptional small lenses (Note to Nikon: please get off your butt and make some more, and better, DX . . . read more

Nikon 1 J2 review by Nasim Mansurov at P.Life: The Nikon 1 J2 is still overpriced. At $550 for a single lens kit, it just makes no sense to buy it. Not when the V1 kit is $299 and not when excellent Micro 4/3 and Sony cameras are priced $500 and less.

Nikon 1 J2 vs Sony NEX-5r High ISO Comparison (ISO 1600-6400)

For those interested, this review contains sections with comparisons to the Olympus EM-5, the Sony NEX-5R, and the Canon EOS M. Of course, being equipped with a much smaller sensor, the Nikon 1 J2 is no match for these cvameras when it comes to high iso performance, but the little guy does have a couple of aces under its sleeves:

"The Nikon 1 system has an interesting story to tell. When Nikon initially launched its first mirrorless system, it positioned two cameras for different segments – the Nikon 1 J1 for beginners and those who wanted to move up from a point and . . . read more

Resolution (And moire) comparison test between the Sony NEX-7, NEX-5R, Fuji X-E1, Panasonic G5 and Olympus E-M5 at Dslr-Check.

Test resolution Panasonic DMC-G5 versus OM-D NEX7 XE1 and NEX5R

Two things are amazing about this comparison: First, the amount of detail these small sensors can resolve nowadays. And second, how susceptible they have become to moire due to weak or absent antialiasing filter. There are full sized samples from each camera, a bit further down the page, one for a jpeg straight from the camera and another jpeg converted from Lightroom. Oh, there's another amazing thing, the amount of screw-ups Google translator can do on a simple page as this: . . . read more

Olympus E-M5 cameras used (among some Canon 5D mk II and Alexas) in filming the new Mad Max:Road Fury movie!

Olympus E-M5 cameras used in filming the new Max Max: Road Fury (2013) movie.

The use of Alexa pro film cameras, and even Canon's 5D mark II/III is expected, but the E-M5, wow. Maybe they fell for the almost steadycam-ish results the IBIS-5 stabilizer produces: 

"The film was shot by John Seale ACS ASC (and David Burr ACS on second unit) using six ALEXA PLUS cameras and four ALEXA M cameras, as well as Canon 5Ds and Olympus OM-D E-M5s, according to the Australian Cinematographers Society (ACS), which initially reported the end of principal photography. (Initial plans to shoot in 3D were scrapped and the film is . . . read more

Nasim Mansurov at PhotographyLife: Battle of the mirrorless (part 1), the Nikon 1 J2, Canon EOS-M, Sony NEX-F3, Sony NEX-5R/NEX-6, Sony NEX-7 and Olympus OM-D EM-5 duke it out above iso 1600.

The Nikon J2 clearly looks the worst in the group

I really respect Mr. Mansurovs musings and reviews, but this 'battle' comes straight from the land of bloody obvious. There's a mini sensor (the Nikon 1 J2), a bit larger one (Olympus E-M5) and then a whole bunch of Aps-c sized ones. At least throw in a Fujifilm X-E1 in the mix for some real fun. I guess part 2 (Dynamic range) will be more interesting.

"As I have already mentioned before, I will be measuring dynamic range myself going forward without having to rely on other websites for the data. It will be interesting to see how my data compares to other sites like DxOMark. I am not . . . read more

Pop Photo camera of the year: Canon 5D Mark III. Runner up(s): Nikon D800 and Sony SLT A-99. Honorably Mentions: Fujifilm X-pro1 and Olympus E-M5.

Since there's no entry in my lexicon for 'camera of the year methodology' will refrain from a rant flood, and pass you on to the article, as the Pop Photo editors explain the why and how of the whole thing:

"2012 proved a truly great year for cameras. In the wake of 2011’s devastating tsunami in Japan and flooding in Thailand, camera manufacturers released nearly two years’ worth of terrific models in 2012, all within a span of eight months.

But our Camera of the Year choice came down to just three real finalists—the Canon EOS 5D Mark III, the Nikon D800, . . . read more

Olympus OMD EM-5 vs Fujifilm X-E1 comparison review by Lindsay Dobson: You can't compare the incomparable, each camera is good on its own merit. Also: Many gorgeous images!

When speed is important, or RAW shooting, I grab my OMD.

"So how do I feel about my new cameras? Well I’m delighted with both of them, but for different reasons. I was more or less able to predict how the XE1 would perform based on my ownership and love for my existing X cameras and my familiarity with the brand. But the OMD was something of a revelation, I really didn’t expect a micro 4/3 camera to produce images which were often difficult to distinguish from those of the Fuji, even in low light.

There really is very little between them. Fuji grain is quite fine and the images are very smooth, but you really only . . . read more

The Gritty Monkey reviews the Fujifilm X-E1, pits it against the Sony NEX-7 and Olympus E-M5, ends up choosing the smelliest one.

"So why the Fuji X-E1 then?

- This might sound crazy to a lot of people, but one of the first reasons why I ended up choosing the X-E1 is because that camera just looks beautiful. It smells like photography, It’s like it’s calling you to take it with you and go shoot something! Whether ugly tools are as good as nice looking ones to craft beautiful art is a tough question, I’ll leave it up to you  All I know is that the form of this camera is almost inspiring.
- I love the dedicated dials to set the shutter speed and exposure compensation, and the aperture settings directly on
. . . read more

DSLR-Check (Japan) runs the Nikon D800E, Fuji X-E1, Nikon D3200, Sony NEX-6, and Olympus E-M5 through ISO noise tests with interesting results.

Clearly the D800E outresolves all others, at any iso sattings, even base iso. However, the interesting thing is how close all the other entries are to each other. This test appear to be in no way scientific, so take it with a grain of noise salt. Click on the chart to see it in full resolution. Here's what Google pransklate has to say:

"The fact that even with only (it almost single-focus) lens angle of view of the standard, personally, but there can be no choice as X mount status quo, because the problem is almost the only lens lineup this happens, fast I just want you to . . . read more

AF speed duel at m43.eu: Olympus OM-D E-M5 vs Canon EOS M, ok, this is not funny any longer.

Canon EOS M black, front, with speedlite attached.

"At the beginning of the planning that somehow I will discuss this movie, but after some thought, I leave it - mercifully - no comment . Just one note: it was a battle of the Olympus E-M5, but just as quickly set the focus two new PEN E-PL5 s and E-PM2. Also, a comparison with Panasonikiem G5, or GH3 would GF5 very similar result.

Well, the first Micro Four Thirds mirrorless cameras also were not as fast as the latest models. What remains is to wish Canon to the rapid development of the system." . . . read more

Ephotozine names Olympus Live-time mode as best new technology of 2012, we'd add Oly's 5-axis IBIS to that.

Olympus E-M5 black with both grips attached.

"It's a feature for long exposures caused by low light or when you're using a dark ND filter such as the Lee Filters Big Stopper. The camera starts recording and gives a screen preview at intervals as the exposure builds. You can adjust the time between previews through the camera's menu. So, for example, when shooting at ISO200 you can view 24 steps with intervals of between 0.5 sec and 60 seconds. As the ISO increases the number of steps you can view decreases. You set an interval rate that will show gradual build up of exposure so you can stop when the correct exposure is reached." . . . read more

The Online Photographer: Impressions of the Olympus OM-D, Part II, by Ctein.

Olympus OM-D E-M5 black with 12-50mm lens and vertical horizontal grips.

"The technical noise measurements do not hint at how much better the OM-D is. As I explained in the aforementioned column, it's not just about the quantity but quality of noise. The OM-D noise is extremely uniform and fine-grained. Up to ISO 800, it's essentially ignorable. When it becomes bothersome, the faintest whiff of noise reduction will take care of it."

Lumix G X Vario 35-100mm f/2.8 ASPH lens review by Jordan Steele at Admiring Light: This lens finally brings a top tier telephoto zoom to the Micro 4/3 system, and I can definitely recommend this lens for the serious Micro 4/3 shooter. A great lens.

As micro 4/3 zoom lenses go, the 35-100mm f/2.8 is among the sharpest,

The Lens was tested with Panasonic GX1 and Olympus E-M5 bodies.

"The cons list above may seem a bit nitpicky to some. Especially the last point, so let me explain. The image quality of this lens is outstanding, and the lens is a worthy addition to the Micro 4/3 lineup. However, compared with the newest 70-200mm lenses from Canon and Nikon, it’s not quite going to match those stellar optics. Instead, I’d say it’s on the level of something like the original Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L IS. So, very, very good, but not flawless. Considering it’s $1,000 less than those new Canon and Nikon lenses, though, I can forgive this. Still, it’s a pricey lens at $1,499, and will really only cater to those who know they need an f/2.8 telephoto zoom in this range. . . . read more

Impressions of the Olympus OM-D, Part I, at The Online Photographer: No buyer's remorse here.

"The OM-D has five customizable buttons, even more with some lenses and the auxiliary battery pack. I can do a lot with five buttons. See Custom Menu B/Button Function. The fn2 button, right next to the shutter release, became a manual/autofocus toggle. The record button, right behind it, now zooms the viewfinder for more accurate focusing."

. . . read more

How to tweak your Olympus E-M5 to shoot sports by Jim Huffman at SteveHuffphoto.com

Well, turning off the rear LCD takes you a long way, but there's more that that:

"go into custom buttons – and assign magnify to any function button (or the record button). now, to enter magnify, hit the control button twice. magnify stays on until you half press the shutter release! and, you will note that the magnify is . . . read more

Olympus EM-5 Review at NeoCamera: Top-notch image quality with some interface quirks

"The OM-D E-M5 struggles with color accuracy. There are lots of Picture Modes but none produce realistic colors across the spectrum. The best image colors are obtained in Natural style with Saturation dials down to -1. The red channel remains too high regardless of settings. This is obviously avoidable for those who shoot RAW. . . . read more

A trip to Italy with the Fujifilm X-Pro 1, from a Olympus E-M5 shooters point of view: Oly good but Fuji best, but not always, especially if image quality is not your sole consideration.

"Overall I was not impressed using the X-Pro 1 with firmware 1. In fact if I purchased the system I would return it right away and buy a beer to cry into. The photo quality is great, the color is good but the areas that the Fuji fails in…well it really fails.

Am I happy with the results of the X-Pro 1? Kinda..

The poor operating performance of firmware version 1 really soured my enjoyment of this camera. I did have the opportunity to upgrade the camera and lenses to firmware version 2 which to the credit of Fuji is much faster then . . . read more

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