Nikon Coolpix A review at DPreview "while solid in most respects, it's not class-leading in any respect."

"The Coolpix A is a very good camera that, if it stood in isolation, would represent an interesting addition to the camera market. Of course the reality is that it doesn't exist in a vacuum and, while many photographers will be very happy with it, a considerable portion of its thunder is stolen by the Ricoh GR - a camera that achieves the unusual trick of being a touch better in almost every respect while also being significantly cheaper.

We're also not totally convinced about the price/size/performance balance that either of these cameras strikes, given their only moderately-bright F2.8 lenses. In the course of the review process we have increasingly appreciated their pocketability, though."

Nikon 5200 review @ DPreview "At high ISO sensitivities, the noise performance of the D5200 is the best that we've seen from a DSLR at this price point"

"The Nikon D5200 is a solid performer that offers an impressive array of specifications for a camera of its class. Indeed, the number of features it shares with its higher-end Nikon stablemates is to be applauded. In addition to an excellent 24MP sensor that gives up precious little to that of the (non-AA filtered) D7100, the D5200 boasts a 39 point AF system, lens-dependent Auto ISO implementation and class-leading high ISO noise performance.

The D5200 stands out as the only recent-model Nikon DSLR to sport an articulated screen which comes in handy for both stills and video shooters, though we can't help but wish it was touch enabled as is the one on the Canon EOS T5i/700D. The D5200 offers a reasonable number of external controls, but as you'd expect on a camera of this class, more advanced users will have to satisfy their needs with visits to the main menu. You do have a customizeable Fn button though, and the camera's '[i]' button allows more direct access to 14 separate camera and shooting settings. If we nitpick, we'd like to see even faster access that omits a second confirmation click before you can actually change a setting in this manner. Overall though, we find that the D5200 strikes a nice balance between providing essential shooting controls without overwhelming novice DSLR users."

Nikon D7100 in-depth review by DPreview "...if you don't have a compelling reason to shoot with a full frame DSLR, the APS-C D7100 offers a largely similar shooting experience"

"The D7100 delivers outstanding image quality and detail rendition at low ISOs in both JPEG and Raw mode. Noise does start to become visible at the pixel level even at moderate ISO sensitivities, but is kept well under control given the pixel density of its 24MP APS-C sensor. While not a surprise, it is worth pointing out that if you're after the very best that this sensor can deliver, you'll not be well-served by the 18-105mm kit zoom. In both our studio and real-world shooting, we've found noticeably better results with Nikon's high-end primes and fast zoom lenses.

While the camera's video specs are impressive, its video output is a bit softer than we'd like. If you want to record at 1080 50i or 60i, keep in mind that this is only possible after you've set the camera to its 1.3x crop mode. Unfortunately, using this crop mode results in output that is upsampled to 1920 x 1080, making this mode of little use for even amateur videographers.

The Nikon D7100 rounds out Nikon's recently revamped lineup of enthusiast-targeted DSLRs. It may sit below the full frame D800 and D600 in price, but . . . read more

Nikon 1 S1 review @ trustedreviews "Reliable image quality and lightning quick auto-focus but noisy photos at higher ISOs"

"There's an awful lot to like about the Nikon 1 S1's photos, too, though it’s not without its faults.
The Auto White Balance system consistently renders colours correctly with a noticeable absence of any particular colour cast. If anything, colours are a tad subdued – if you have the skill it’s worth boosting them when editing afterwards. The S1's exposure system is also generally reliable, with metering only exhibiting the slight tendency to underexpose.
One area where the Nikon 1 S1, somewhat predictably, suffers, is noise control at high ISO settings. Owing to the smaller sensor employed in the S1 in comparison to other similar CSCs, noise is problematic even at lower ISO settings. Although the camera managed to maintain a certain amount of detail at these higher settings, the necessary noise reduction results in some detail lost and sharpness loss."

Camera labs revewed the Nikon D7100 "The Nikon D7100 is a worthy successor to the D7000 and a sufficiently capable camera to fill the vacancy at the top end of Nikon's DX range"

"Perhaps understandably, a lot of the attention it has received since its launch has focused on its absent optical low-pass filter, with inflated expectations of a resultant boost in sharpness and definition. It now looks like any resulting increase in quality over the company's other 24 Megapixel DX bodies is at best, marginal, and many will no doubt be disappointed by that. But don't lose sight of the fact that OLPF or not, the D7100's sensor produces superb quality 24 Megapixel images; it's just that they're really close to what the cheaper D5200 delivers.

Where it matters to advanced enthusiast and semi-pro users though, the D7100 delivers, with enhancements to build quality and handling, more capable AF and improved continuous shooting, deeper bracketing, a bigger screen and new shooting modes including HDR and effects filters. There's also something to tempt videographers, with new movie modes, built-in stero mics and a headphone socket.

. . . read more

Nikon D7100 review at NPhoto: "Capable of producing superb images with lots of detail and natural colour, but its worth keeping an eye on the image histogram view though as the Matrix Metering doesn’t always do what you expect."

Angela Nicholson reviews Nikon's latest foray into the no-low-pass filter territory, the brand new, D7100:

"Like the Nikon D3200 and D5200, the D7100 has a 24MP sensor, but Nikon has left off the low-pass filter.

Low-pass or anti-aliasing filters are usually put over a camera’s sensor to reduce the risk of moiré interference occurring when photographing subjects with fine patterning that is close to the camera’s resolution limit. The downside of using them is that the image is softened and needs sharpening post capture.

So does omitting the filter from the sensor make any difference to the images? Our tests indicate that it does. At the lower sensitivity settings the D7100 can’t resolve any more detail than the D3200 or D5200, but the images look a little sharper straight from the camera."

Nikon uder fire for catering to both Wildlife photographers and hunters.

The Independent's Hannah Martin reports:

"Nikon, one of photography’s most respected names, faces a backlash from within the industry for portraying itself as a friend of wildlife photography while making sights for rifles for big game trophy hunters in the US and Africa.

The Japanese camera manufacturer makes a rifle scope designed specifically for killing large game, the £170 “Monarch African”.

Nikon’s marketing literature boasts that the scope is perfect “for those seeking their dangerous game adventure on the dark continent” and is “the proven choice for dangerous big game hunting”, adding: “Africa has long been a continent of dreams for hunters around the world.”"

Nikon releases new firmware upgrades for the D800 and D600

The new firmware adds support for the new AF-S NIKKOR 800mm f/5.6E FL ED VR for both cameras, and several image and AF performance issues for the D800 are resolved. In D600 it also changes the HDMI frame output size  from 95% to 100%

D800 firmware A: 1.01 / B:1.02 addresses the following issues:

  • Support for the AF-S NIKKOR 800mm f/5.6E FL ED VR has been added.
  • Subject tracking performance in AF-C (continuous-servo autofocus) autofocus mode with framing using the viewfinder has been improved.
  • Gamut for Adobe RGB images displayed in the camera's monitor has been changed. This enables more vivid display of images.
  • With live view photography in [M] (Manual) exposure mode, exposure preview was always on.  This issue has been resolved.
  • In some very rare cases when certain memory cards were used, movie recording would stop, even when the time remaining display indicated remaining recording time.  This issue has been resolved.
  • With shooting at an image quality setting of TIFF (RGB) and an image size setting of Small, the right edge of images contained a purple line.  This issue has been resolved.
  • In some rare cases, images recorded in JPEG format could not be opened by some software applications.  This issue has been resolved.
  • In some very rare cases, colors would change with shooting when white balance was set to a specific color temperature, as with Preset manual or Choose color temp.  This issue has been resolved.

Nikon Coolpix A gets its DxO Mark "offers similar or better image quality to many entry-level or mid range DSLRs"

"Launched in March 2013 the $1097 Coolpix A is Nikon’s first compact camera with an APC-S sensor and features the same 16.2-megapixel DX sensor from Nikon’s D7000 DSLR but with its optical low-pass filter removed. Utilizing a fixed NIKKOR 18.5mm f/2.8 prime lens (equivalent to 28mm in 35mm terms) the Nikon Coolpix A has the right ingredients for great image quality so let’s see how it performs.       

Not wanting to undermine their DSLR sales Nikon have used a smaller 1-inch sensor in their 1 Series of Hybrid cameras but it seems with the Nikon Coolpix Athey’re looking to gain market share in the high-end compact market, too. With less versatile fixed lenses and high price tags it’s a niche segment of the overall camera market however and one that’s already brimming with options like the $1299 Fujifilm X100S,  $2798 Sony RX1 and $999 Sigma DP3."

Nikon D7100 tested by the DXO Mark "A standout among APS-C shooters that holds its own against full-frame competitors"

Nikon's latest and more featured packed APS-C camera, the D7100 replaced the successfully D7000 adding more resolution, as well as the "advantage" of not having an antialiasing filter. At first there was concerns about the number of megapixels as well as the absence of the antialiasing filter. The DXO testing reveals class leading performance not only to the APS-C size DSLR's but some interesting results compared with the newest Full frame size Cameras.

"Although the new Nikon D7100 looks fairly similar to its predecessor (the popular Nikon D7000), Nikon has made some significant changes under the hood that belie the surface similarity. The D7100 not only includes a higher-resolution CMOS sensor, but even more significantly, the company chose to use a sensor without an anti-alias filter for the first time on a non-full-frame DSLR. While this should enable better sharpness and resolution, it may also result in more moiré patterns in some images."

DXO Mark almost a year after the release of the Nikon D800, publishes a four part review trying to discover the best lenses for the 36 megapixel beast

“Nikon D800 functions as Nikon’s flagship camera” according to DXO Mark, and it is currently the top camera on their Sensor Scores. The 36mp image sensor is an extremely demanding piece of photography both to the photographer and the lens. The resolution advantage is easily lost when it's not focused properly, or the quality of the lens does not meet the highest standards. Only when using lenses like the Nikon AF-S Nikkor 16-35mm f/4G ED VR, Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED and the Nikon 70-200mm f/4G ED VR  will get some decent zoom performance wile the best results will only come when using prime lenses like the Carl Zeiss Distagon 15mm f/2.8, Nikon AF-S Nikkor 85mm f/1.4G and will shine with the new Sigma 35mm F1.4 DG HSM.

"Announced in 2012, the Nikon D800 is the current undisputed king of DxOMark, with results that eclipse every other camera from all other manufacturers. However, with so much resolution on tap, the question is, which lenses should you use to make the best of what you’ve got? The DxOMark labs have tested 61 different lenses on the D800 to bring you an unparalleled resource of which lenses are best and which should be avoided. . . . read more

Nikon unveils the Coolpix A, a DX sized fixed lens prosumer camera.

Nikon's much rumored DX entry in the prosumer segment is finally here, and if you ask me, its quite underwhelming. For $1100/£1000/€1200 a prospective buyer gets a metal prosumer body camera with a fixed yawny 28mm f2.8 lens, the same sensor that was used in the D7000, but sans the antialiasing filter, and that's pretty much it. Notably missing from this 1000+ camera are features like GPS, WiFi, and an articulated screen. Furthermore, Nikon does 'a Sony' here and prices the optical viewfinder at almost $500. I Can't see this camera selling in serious numbers at anywhere near its initial price, maybe Nikon chose to put the Coolpix A at this price to make its entry level Dslr cameras look cheap by comparison.  . . . read more

Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR lens Review at the photography Blog

Zoltan Arva-Toth tests the lens on a Nikon D7000 Dslr body:

​"When compared to the superzoom competition, the Nikon 18-300mm lens certainly holds its own. Centre sharpness is generally adequate to good, approaching very good levels at certain zoom settings. The borders and especially the corners tend to be soft but improve upon stopping down (to varying degrees, depending on focal length). Vignetting is fairly well controlled except at 18mm f/3.5, where the corners are approximately 2 stops darker than the centre of the frame, assuming an evenly illuminated scene. Chromatic aberrations and geometric distortions are relatively strong, but both can be . . . read more

Nikkor AF-S 85mm f/1.4G lens review at Photozone.de

Markus Stamm reviews the lens with a Nikon D7000 DX format Dslr camera:

"Nikon has a winner here, the AF-S 85/1.4 performs on a very high level. Sharpness is excellent in the image center from f/2 onwards, border and corners follow only slightly behind wide open, reaching excellent resolution stopped down, too. For a portrait lens, this is a quite rare performance characteristic. For the intended usage, portraiture, a lack of sharpness towards the borders and corners usually would not be an issue, but having the extra sharpness available opens up new creative options. . . . read more

Nikon 1 S1 review by Joshua Waller at EPZ: "The Nikon 1 S1 has a number of impressive high speed feature built into a very compact and stylish body."

"The Nikon 1 S1 is a capable camera, producing pleasing images with lots of detail despite only having a 10 megapixel sensor, and it shoots at 60fps with a number of potentially useful high speed shooting modes, including the ability to save the best 5 shots taken in Smart Photo Selector mode, or see the scene in slow motion and pick a photo from it. Full HD video with stereo sound is included, as well as high speed video recording, although the lack of image stabilisation could be an issue for some. For someone looking for a fast, compact, and good looking compact camera, the Nikon 1 S1 could make a good choice, particularly if you'd be interested in changing lenses at a later date." . . . read more

Nikon 1 S1 review at DxO Mark "The S1’s image quality isn’t better than their 14Mp J3 or V2 offerings"

"The Nikon 1 S1 features the same 10.1-megapixel resolution found on most Nikon Hybrids with the exception of the 14.2-megapixel V2 and J3. There’s also an increased 100 – 6400 ISO sensitivity range, 15 fps continuous shooting with autofocus and an Advanced Hybrid Autofocus system, but no hotshot or EVF.

The Nikon 1 S1 does have a few things going for it most notably the rapid 15fps burst shooting, advanced hybrid autofocus system and, for Nikkor glass owners, compatibility with F mount lenses. The 1-inch CX sensor also means the native 1 Nikkor lenses should be more compact than many Hybrid systems which is great if you want to travel light.   

In the DxOMark Scores however the Nikon 1 Series does not hit the usual heights for Nikon cameras and the S1’s Image Quality is disappointing. With no Image Quality improvement over existing 10-megapixel Nikon 1 Series Hybrids the extra $100 the S1 costs is only buying extra features."

Nikon D7100 unveiled, another one that skips the optical low-pass filter.

The D7100 seemingly comes with substantially upgraded innards, with 4 features standing out: The new sophisticated 51-point (15 cross-type) Autofocus system, employing the same focusing and tracking algorithms as the much more expensive D4.  The ditching of the anti-aliasing filter, allowing the D7100 to join the ever growing 'no-filter' club, together with the Nikon D800E, Pentax K-5IIs et al. Another stand out feature is the new 1.3x cropping mode that extends the reach of lenses, and spreads out the AF points to the very edges of the frame. For example, the full frame 80-400mm now becomes a 160-800mm lens on the D7100. Couple this with a high 7 fps speed, and you've got yourselves a wildlife/soccer mom/paparazzi dream. . . . read more

Nikon D600 review by Ivo Freriks at Camera Stuff Review

Ivo's lens of choise for this review was the Nikkor 24-85mm f3.5-4.5G VR lens.

"Is the Nikon D600 a game-changer? When you look at the image quality, the Nikon D600 still has to acknowledge the superiority of the Nikon D800E. But that is the best camera we've tested to date. Both cameras are more or less equal in terms of dynamic range, color reproduction in daylight and signal / noise ratio. The Nikon D800E trumps the Nikon D600 in our lab actually only with the automatic white balance in tungsten light and in resolution. The latter is not surprising, because the Nikon D800E has 24 megapixels, and not 36 megapixels like the Nikon D800. . . . read more

Steve Huff reviews the Nikon V2: "The more things change..the more they stay the same"

"If you are interested in the Nikon V1 system TODAY, even with killer competitors out there then I highly recommend going with a V1 deal while they last. They may be and probably will all be gone within a week or two of this review posting but at $399 for a V1 and two lens kit, that is steal compared to the same V2 kit at under $1000. IQ is pretty identical between the V1 and V2 and most shots you will not even notice any difference in real world shooting. I was enthusiastic about the V1 because at the time there was nothing out there with the size, build, speed, metering and AF capabilities to match it and even with the small sensor, results were great. Today it is a different story (OM-D) and Nikon just has not done enough with the V2 to up the ante or make . . . read more

Nikon ViewNX 2.7.2 update released.

Here's what's new:

  • Support for the COOLPIX P520, COOLPIX S9500, COOLPIX S9400, COOLPIX S5200, COOLPIX S31, COOLPIX AW110, COOLPIX L820, and COOLPIX L27 has been added.
  • With the renewal of Nikon's image storage and sharing service, my Picturetown (launched as NIKON IMAGE SPACE on January 28, 2013), ViewNX 2 has been modified to provide collaboration with NIKON IMAGE SPACE.
  • The my Picturetown tab in the Browser palette has been changed to a NIKON IMAGE SPACE tab.

Nikon 1 J3 does not impress the DXO Markers: More 'Boo' than 'Woo' again for Nikon's 1 series.

"Although the new Nikon 1 J3 has been updated over its predecessor with the higher-resolution sensor found in Nikon’s top-of-the-line interchangeable lens model, its overall performance scores haven’t improved over the J2. The camera seems to be hampered by the reduction in overall sensitivity range and most notably scored 2/3 stop lower than the J2 for color depth. Given that cameras such as the Olympus PEN E-PL5 and Pentax K 01 perform significantly better than the J3 despite being priced equivalently or less, the J3 doesn’t seem to provide a good value per dollar for those seeking the best image quality from an interchangeable lens camera. . . . read more

Nikon D600 vs Canon 6D Epic Shootout Comparison by Michael Andrew

Epic indeed, the introductory scenes are shot with a Canon 5D Mark III. Michael Andrew, A.K.A Michal the Maven, A.K.A Michal the Mentor is very careful in his review not to offend fanbois of either camp: 

"This is my long awaited review of the Nikon D600 vs the Canon 6D in an Epic, side to side shootout testing some of the most important aspects of the two cameras. As I mention on the video, these are 2 very different cameras. D600 is better as an "all round" camera, the 6D excels in low light (wedding photographers are going to love the 6D). You can check out the Crash Course DVDs I have for both cameras on my products page, they are available both as DVD & immediate download: http://www.michaelthemaven.com/products/ . . . read more

Nikon D5200 review by Ken Rockwell: "The D5200 is an excellent camera that weighs next to nothing"

I'll refrain from any comments this time, after all, Ken's reviews DO have a school of followers. His lens of choice for this review is the Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G AF-S DX and he provides some full-ress image samples too:

"The Nikon D5200 is a swell little camera, but I wouldn't pay $800 for a D5200 when I can get the pretty much identical Nikon D5100 new or refurbished for about half price as of the beginning of 2013. I don't see anything significant to make it worthwhile to throw more money at the newer D5200 if you can still get the D5100 instead, but if you want the newest, sure, the D5200 is a great camera.

. . . read more

The Nikon FT1 Adapter: how to use Nkkor F-mount lenses on a Nikon 1 compact system camera, by J.Meyer at NPhoto.

This guide will be useful until Nikon unveils its APS-C (or larger!) mirrorless system sometime in the near future, and most serious Nikon shooters will forget that the 1 series has ever existed :)

"Nikon 1 cameras use a different lens mount – and different lenses – to the Nikon D-SLR range, but the FT1 adapter, which sells for around £200, provides the missing link. With this gadget, you can connect any of your Nikon SLR lenses to a Nikon 1 compact system camera. There are technical differences between these two types of camera. The Nikon 1 uses a much smaller, ‘CX’ format sensor, measuring just 13.2×8.8mm. This gives the Nikon 1 cameras a crop factor of 2.7x, which means that you must multiply the focal length of any lens by 2.7 to arrive at its ‘effective’ focal length. . . . read more

Roger Cicala checks out the cost of a whole system-mirrorless, (Olympus) vs the Dslr establishment of Canon, Nikon, Pentax and Sony.

 All I can say is 'ouch'. And it was a double ouch for Roger, since after going through all the trouble assembling a kick-ass micro 4/3 system he found out it wasn't that portable any longer, so in the end he chose something even smaller. No, not the Pentax Q:

"In my last post I made a preliminary list of systems I was going to consider. Some people are a little surprised I’m considering crop sensor cameras. I’m surprised that they’re surprised. I’ve shot with a micro 4/3 system for months and it certainly met 80% of my needs, so an APS-C based camera may be just fine. Or I may decide that I need to have a full-frame camera. I’ve generally shot full frame for the last several years. . . . read more

The Tamron SP 24-70mm f/2.8 Di VC USD excels at the DXO Mark bench: "When mounted on a Canon 5D Mark II, the Tamron SP 24-70mm F2.8 Di VC USD achieves an overall DxOMark Score of 24, the 2nd highest score in our database for a high-speed zoom."

So, the Tamron manages to closely match such expensive and optically well endowed lenses as the Canon 24-70mm f2.8L USM II, and the Nikkor 24-70mm G ED, both costing around the 2 grand mark in every major western currency:

"The Tamron SP 24-70mm f/2.8 Di VC USD is in the top three best performing high-speed standard zooms currently available. We’ve only looked at the imaging performance, but it’s as impressive optically as the highly regarded Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f2.8G ED. At $1,299 it’s not cheap but it is competitively priced – to improve on the image quality you would have to spend $1,000 for the sublime Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8 II USM. Dropping down . . . read more

Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8G ED VR II Review by Mark Goldstein at the Photography Blog: Premium build, optics, and price. Weight too.

Mark tested the lens with a Nikon D4 full-frame Dslr body.

"The lens' sharpness is excellent at most focal lengths and f-stops. Edge sharpness is also commendably good, only requiring stopping-down to f/5.6 to get acceptable results. Distortion is well-controlled, chromatic aberrations are only really conspicuous by their almost complete absence, and the lens exhibits pleasingly rounded bokeh thanks to the 9-blade aperture. All in all, the Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm f/4G ED VR delivers great results throughtout its zoom range. So the Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm f/4G ED VR offers a versatile focal range, fast maximum aperture, well-implemented Vibration Reduction system, fast auto-focus and excellent build quality and weather-proofing. Sure, it's big and heavy, but it does offer a compelling combination of versatility, durability . . . read more

Nikon P7700 passes the DXO Mark bench with honors: The best compact camera Nikon has made to date, it seems to have been designed around a wish-list of all the things that a photographer or a serious amateur would want on an everyday camera.

"Best Nikon camera" means of course that-sensor wise, it is still a fair bit behind Fuji's X10, but ahead of Canon's Powershot G15. Ben Boswell from DXO Labs writes the conclusion:

"Nikon divides its cameras into a number of different categories: DSLR, Nikon 1 (their compact system cameras) and Coolpix, its compact range. Coolpix is further divided: All Weather, Life, Style and Performance. The Coolpix P7700 is at the top of the Performance division, which is in turn the top of the Coolpix Division. That is to say that this is, for Nikon, the best compact they make. This is a camera that has been designed around a wish-list of all the things that a photographer or a serious amateur would want on an everyday camera and Nikon have delivered something really good." . . . read more

Nasim Mansurov reviews and compares the AF-S NIKKOR 70-200mm f/4G ED VR and AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8G ED VR II lenses.

Nasim uses a D800E as a test body:

"As you may already know, the Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8G VR II was a disappointment for some photographers, because it suffers from a “lens breathing” optical design, where the focal length of the lens varies depending on subject distance. At close distances, the 70-200mm loses quite a bit of the range, which can be a problem for those of us that like to fill the frame with small objects. The Nikon 70-200mm f/4G VR does not have this problem – I measured its focal length and it was exactly 70-200mm, no matter how close or far I focused. Its optical formula is similar to that of the Tamron 70-200mm f/2.8 . . . read more

The Panasonic Fz200 superzoom gets its DXO Mark badge: "It boasts a top specification but if image quality is more important the Canon SX50 HS or Nikon P7700 both rank higher in the DxOMark Sensor Scores and cost less on the high street too."

Panasonic is 'doing a Canon' here, and manages to spew out a flagship that ranks a bit lower than its predecessor, the FZ150. How on earth did they accomplish that? The sensor size is unchanged, and according to their marketing blurb the new one is better than the old, in every possible way:

"With an Overall DxOMark Sensor Score of 37 for the Lumix DMC-FZ200, compared to 40 for its predecessor the FZ150, this latest Panasonic Bridge camera maintains the good image quality of the DMC-FZ line. Despite the slightly lower score than its predecessor a difference of only 3 points equates to less than -1/3 of a Stop overall and in real world terms there’s no difference. The FZ200 also boasts some impressive specifications, the most notable of which is the fixed f/2.8 maximum aperture. If you’re after a compact style camera for sports and wildlife photography this is significant as it enables you to use lower ISO settings for better quality images when fully zoomed in. . . . read more

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