Sony E 35mm f/1.8 OSS Lens review (tested with a NEX7) by Matthew Durr: There’s no denying that the 35mm f/1.8 is the prime lens that a large majority of NEX photographers have been waiting for.

The Sony 35mm f/1.8 OSS has the ability to focus to a close .98 feet/.3 meters.

The 35mm f/1.8 is a fantastic lens, despite its focusing limitations dependent on CDAF. The only “real” knacks against it—heavy vignetting and noticeable fringing wide-open—can easily be worked around depending on the situation, what settings you shoot at, and how much post-processing you are used to doing. This lens truly is an all-purpose E-mount lens for excellent video and low-light photographs with shallow depth of field. Though other cheaper options exist in the general focal range for the system (the tack-sharp Sigma 30mm f/2.8 for E-mount) or other camera manufacturers (Samsung NX 30mm f/2), there’s no denying that the 35mm f/1.8 is the prime lens that a large majority of NEX

photographers have been waiting for.

Pros

Good build quality, but some plastic construction can be a turn-off for those coming from all-metal lenses.
Smooth operation in most shooting situations, see cons.
Great sharpness across  the aperture range especially in the center, but even in the corners of the difficult NEX-7.
No field curvature or noticeable focus shift.
Most bokeh tends to be smooth and undistracting, see cons.
Out of focus highlights usually look great at the wider (f/1.8-4 apertures).
Chromatic aberrations easy to deal with around f/2.8 on.
Zero veiling flare.
Zero distortion.
Extremely effective optical stabilization for long-exposure photos and smooth video.
Close-focus is short.
A super-compact and lightweight E-mount lens that provides a “fast 50″ field of view that many NEX photographers have been waiting for ever since the camera line’s introduction.


Cons

Some plastic construction
Situation-specific focusing issues bring overall operation to an essential standstill.
“Okay” sharpness wide-open.
Sharpness at close-medium distances isn’t consistent compared to at infinity.
Not a truly circular aperture as the lens is stopped down.
In some situations, bokeh can be distracting, such as with tree branches.
Particularly bright out-of-focus highlights have many artifacts.
Chromatic aberrations aren’t well controlled at and close to wide-open.
“Okay” control of flare reflections depending on where the source of light is in the frame.
Heavy vignetting with a complicated pattern wide-open, takes stopping down to f/5.6 to get rid of.
Not cheap, though at $450 it’s one of the least expensive options for this field of view on a mirrorless camera.

Photo ID Database: 
Selected Items
Click to close the selection preview
Compare List
Teleconverters: Click to see the selected items
Click to Compare the selected items
Flashes: Click to see the selected items
Click to Compare the selected items
Lenses: Click to see the selected items
Click to Compare the selected items
Cameras: Click to see the selected items
Click to Compare the selected items