Panasonic's LX-7 lays its sensor on the DXO Mark Bench: "The LX7 represents a serious challenge to both the Canon PowerShot G15 and the Nikon Coolpix P7700"

Panasonic's LX-7 lays its sensor on the DXO Mark Bench: "The LX7 represents a serious challenge to both the Canon PowerShot G15 and the Nikon Coolpix P7700"
Panasonic's LX-7 lays its sensor on the DXO Mark Bench: "The LX7 represents a serious challenge to both the Canon PowerShot G15 and the Nikon Coolpix P7700"

The review fails to mention that the LX-7 is currently priced at $299 at various U.S outlets, and as such, it is the best prosumer camera currently available at that price:

"From the time of its introduction in 2005, the high-end Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX series has provided an attractive alternative to the mainstream (and longer running) G-series from Canon as well as the popular and more recent Nikon CoolPix P7000 series. Apart from the diminutive dimensions and low weight, the LX series offered very high image quality from the combination of a high-grade image-stabilized Leica-branded zoom and what was originally a wide-aspect ratio (16:9) 1/1.65-inch sensor.

Over the various iterations this has been replaced with a more conventional 4:3 aspect ratio 1/1.7-inch CCD and now MOS type imager in the LX7. As such with comparable imaging performance in all areas (with the exception perhaps of Low-Light ISO scores) the LX7 represents a serious challenge to both the Canon PowerShot G15 and the Nikon Coolpix P7700. The Leica zoom doesn’t match the focal range of either but the LX7 has an attractive range nonetheless. However, if greater low-light performance is critical, larger sensor compacts such as the Canon PowerShot G1X or Sony RX100 should also be considered."

"As well as one-stop improvements in DR and Color Depth over its predecessor the LX7 also has better low-light performance at higher ISOs. While the Low-Light scores show a negligible difference (ISO147 vs ISO132) the LX7 shows some qualitative gains at high ISOs (from ISO 1600 onwards). This combined with the brighter lens means the LX7 is a bit more suited to available light photography than the LX5. All in all the MOS sensor in the LX7 shows improvements in every area over the earlier high-quality CCD of the LX5 and puts it squarely in contention with the latest offerings from rivals."

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