Panasonic Lumix G Leica DG Summilux 25mm f/1.4 ASPH lens review by Kurt Munger: The Panasonic Leica DG Macro Elmarit 45mm F/2.8 ASPH turned in a nice performance; there really isn't much to complain about

The Leica DG Summilux 25mm f/1.4 ASPH lens offers almost silent focusing
The LEICA DG SUMMILUX 25mm / F1.4 ASPH. (35 mm camera equivalent: 50mm), based on the Micro Four Thirds System standard, features outstanding brightness of F1.4 realized in the compact and light weight profile. The extraordinary brightness allows a beautiful soft focus for photo and video to be even more impressive and encourages us
To the LEICA DG SUMMILUX 25mm / F1.4 ASPH., Panasonic’s Nano Surface Coating technology is newly adopted. Reflection is dramatically minimized at entire visual light range (380nm-780nm) by applying the extra-low refractive index coating with nano-sized structure on the surface of the lens. It results in the super clear picture with dramatic reduction of ghost and flare.

The PanaLeica lens was tested on a Olympus E-M5 body. 

"The Panasonic Leica DG Macro Elmarit 45mm F/2.8 ASPH turned in a nice performance; there really isn't much to complain about.  Pluses include: low light fall off-even wide open: lens doesn't extend when focusing: lateral color fringing is well controlled: very sharp throughout most of the image area at F/4-5.6: a focus limiter switch; and image stabilization, although that's not very important if you have a newer Olympus camera with 5 axis stabilization control.

A couple of minor complaints are slight axial color fringing when used at large apertures, and bokeh at certain subject to background distances isn't all that smooth, well, big deal right, that's not much to complain about.

Although the Panasonic Leica Macro Elmarit works well for landscape purposes, its best qualities in my opinion are at close focusing distances, that's what it's designed for.  I'd probably choose the smaller and less expensive Olympus 45/1.8 if your primary use will be landscapes and low light hand-held work.

In the centers, the image is critically sharp at F/4-5.6, but F/2.8 is not bad by any means.  In the mid-sections, I see gradual improvements until F/5.6, which is sharp, but not tack sharp like the centers are.  The corners are pretty sharp at F/5.6, but don't respond well to changes in aperture.  Stopping down past F/8 results in excessive softening due to diffraction.  There is almost no color fringing noticeable in the corner crops, that's great!

That's it for the review, if you'd like to help out the site, please visit B&H Photo if you're thinking of purchasing the Panasonic Leica DG Macro Elmarit 45mm F/2.8 lens."

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