Nikon AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.4G review (mounted on a Nikon D800E) by Ivo Freriks at Camera Stuff Review: One of the best Nikon Lenses we've tested so far.

"For a non-zoom lens of 50 mm (since generations already the 'standard' focal length and therefore very popular), this Nikkor is firmly priced of course. Nevertheless, with its extreme sensitivity, it also lives up to that price. The mechanical and optical qualities are very high. The resolution is exceptionally good, and with the exception of some vignetting at large apertures, there are actually no lens errors. The lens is large enough for you to wrap your hand around when shooting. On our wish list for the Nikon 50 mm 1.4G is only vibration reduction.

Resolution Nikon 50mm 1.4G

Of all the available SLRs, the D800E is probably the body with the highest resolution. On such a camera, weak lenses are directly discovered. Not this 50 mm f / 1.4. At the optimum aperture f / 5.6, we measured nearly 4000 line pairs per picture height in the center for a jpg file. This is an exceptional value! And the resolution of a in DCRAW converted RAW file is even 30% higher.  In the corners and at full aperture, the resolution is "only" about 2000. That 'only' we put in quotes, because there are not many lenses that do better. On the D3200, we measure lower resolutions. This is because the sensor resolution is the determining factor, and not the lens.

In practice, the lens draws very sharply under all circumstances. When we had blurred images, it was always a case of camera shake. Especially with the D800E, each flaw becomes visible! Unfortunately, this lens does not have built-in image stabilization.
Chromatic aberration

The measured values ​​for chromatic aberration of the Nikon 50mm 1.4G are excellent too. Not only in the jpg file, in which any chromatic aberration is corrected by the camera, but also in uncorrected RAW files you do not encounter lateral chromatic aberration. In practice shots, we saw the dreaded purple / green fringes along tree branches, etc. nowhere.

Something else is the story of the longitudinal chromatic aberration/color bokeh. As with many fast lenses, below f/2.8 color bokeh is observable, identifiable by green and purple stains behind, respectively, in front of the focusing area."

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