Fujifilm X10 review at Digital Camera Resource Page

If it wasn't for the white disc/orbs bug, this would probably be the best fixed lens camera of 2011/2012. Unfortunately, Fujifilm was unable to fix this issue on the first try, and many X10 owners are growing impatient. Hopefully, this incident will serve as a good reminder to Fujifilm and other manufacturers to not rush things to the market before proper testing:

 

"Overall, the Fuji X10's image quality is good, but there are a few important negatives to bring up. Exposure was generally accurate, though there's a slight tendency to overexpose. Colors are nice and vivid -- especially the reds. Images were slightly soft to my eyes, and if you agree, you may want to turn up the in-camera sharpening a notch. As the previous tests show, noise is kept under control through ISO 400, though after that things go downhill. Using the high sensitivity & low noise EXR mode (or just dropping the resolution to 6MP) will give you better results. Thankfully, the X10 goes easy on the noise reduction, so detail smudging is not an issue. Purple fringing levels were generally low.

Now, the bad news. One fairly minor issue is that the X10 sometimes gets a case of the jaggies, as you can see here and here. A much more significant problem is highlight clipping. If you've got the ISO fixed at 100, which is what you'll want to do to avoid noise, virtually every highlight in the photo will be blown out. The solution is a simple one: adjust the Dynamic Range setting upward -- 200% or 400% will do. You can do this manually at full resolution, or by using the D-Range Priority EXR mode, though keep in mind that most settings are locked up in that mode. The downside of this is that the ISO must be boosted to 200 or 400, which will put more noise in your images. Given how strong the highlight clipping is on the X10, I'd be willing to make that trade-off.

That brings us to the X10's most notorious problem: the "white discs". This phenomenon isn't something you'll encounter often, but when you see it, you'll wonder how Fuji missed this one when they developed the camera. "

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