Fujifilm X-E1 review and comparison to the 5D Mark III by Martin Dopperbauer:The X-E1 is a camera with impressive mechanical and optical quality and great usability. Its images come close in quality to the EOS 5D Mark III over a wide range of ISO settings

Martin provides many full frame image (with intact EXIF) samples along with his review. 

"What I don't like about Fujifilm are their outrageous advertising claims. Sometimes I almost feel ashamed in my honor as an engineer :-) Firstly, there are the exaggeration in the indicated ISO values, cheating of the auto-exposure at high ISO settings and an Auto-ISO function that is constantly using too low ISO levels. With all these measures, Fuji apparently tries to improve noise performance test results.

Then there are untenable statements on the effects of an anti-alias filter. "... Sensor with a unique, highly randomized,

colour filter arrangement ... The benefit is the elimination of the need for an optical low-pass filter ... Removal of the optical low-pass filter ... enabling ... to capture much finer detail ... ". 
In reality, the formation of artifacts is an universal problem in digital signal sampling that always occurs when the analog signal is not sufficiently filtered. It can definitely not be solved by a different color filter array, as alleged here. Some of my test images clearly demonstrate the problem and show rainbow like color iridescence. I was able to observe moiré in images of everyday subjects as well, but to a lesser degree.

Regarding resolution: It is to be noted that the EOS 5D Mark III (with its low-pass filter) records visibly more details than the X-E1 (without the filter), even though the pixel count of the Canon in horizontal and vertical axis is just higher by 18%. Obviously the omission of the alias filter does not help the X-E1 to increase resolution much.

Fuji even claims to have reinvented physics in the lenses of its recently released X100S camera: "The X100S uses a Lens Modulation Optimizer to reduce optical effects examined as lens diffraction ... Even when stopped down to f/16, the X100S Retains sharpness and texture in the smallest detail." A proof to the contrary will not be difficult since diffraction blur is physically unavoidable and significantly occurs at f/16 on sensors of this size.

When we look more closely at the X-E1 it becomes obvious that Fuji's marketing babble is not at all required.
 
The X-E1 is a camera with impressive mechanical and optical quality and great usability. Its images come close in quality to the EOS 5D Mark III over a wide range of ISO settings.
It is pleasing to hold the camera and taking pictures is great fun. Operation of the X-E1 comes close to classical range finder cameras. The Fuji is perhaps not for casual shooters, but photographers who deliberately compose their images will have great pleasure. For them the slightly slow autofocus will not mean much. After all, it regularly nails sharpness right to the point.

I gladly confess that I was never annoyed by moiré artifacts in real shooting situations. If present at all they were rare and weak.

The 18-55 mm zoom lens makes an excellent impression and should not be confused with cheap kit lenses from other camera manufacturers. Its maximum aperture is rather large from f/2.8 to f/4 and the focal range of approximately 28 to 85 mm (converted to full frame) is very practical."

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