Canon EOS 5D Mark II vs EOS 5D Mark III compared.

Canon EOS 5D Mark II vs EOS 5D Mark III compared.
Canon EOS 5D Mark II vs EOS 5D Mark III compared.
Canon EOS 5D Mark II vs EOS 5D Mark III compared.
Canon EOS 5D Mark II vs EOS 5D Mark III compared.
Canon EOS 5D Mark II vs EOS 5D Mark III compared.
Canon EOS 5D Mark II vs EOS 5D Mark III compared.
Canon EOS 5D Mark II vs EOS 5D Mark III compared.
Canon EOS 5D Mark II vs EOS 5D Mark III compared.
Canon EOS 5D Mark II vs EOS 5D Mark III compared.
Canon EOS 5D Mark II vs EOS 5D Mark III compared.
Canon EOS 5D Mark II vs EOS 5D Mark III compared.
Canon EOS 5D Mark II vs EOS 5D Mark III compared.
Canon EOS 5D Mark II vs EOS 5D Mark III compared.
Canon EOS 5D Mark II vs EOS 5D Mark III compared.
Canon EOS 5D Mark II vs EOS 5D Mark III compared.
Canon EOS 5D Mark II vs EOS 5D Mark III compared.

This is the 3rd generation of Canon's famous 5D full frame moniker. Since the update cycle is far slower than the typical 18 month turnaround of the lower specced cropped family bodies, the changes from generation to generation are far more substantial. The first 5D clocked in at 12 Mpixels, the second almost doubled that number and added 1080p video to that, among other things. The 5D Mark III however, is a different type of upgrade, this time the resolution stays at the same level, but everything else is bumped up. And by 'bumped up' we mean that the body has moved much closer to the EOS 1 series pro standards-sans the bulk, while retaining a price close to its predecessor. 

All of the key specs are substantially upgraded compared to the 5D Mark II: the new sensor, coupled with Canon's latest DIGIC 5+ processor, is capable of working from a standard ISO range of 100 - 25,600 to the expanded 50 - 102,800.  There's a new, quieter and more refined shutter (rated to 150.000 actuations), the frames per second are now 6, the raw buffer much larger, the rear lcd screen is bigger, brighter and more detailed, and also protected with hard glass, instead of the easily scratchable plastic of its forerunners.

 The 61-point focus system comes straight from the flagship 1DX, a first for Canon, and a sorely sought feature by owners of previous generation 5D cameras that had to deal with inferior, consumer grade AF loaned from the Aps-c bodies. Talking of Bodies, this has also received its fair share of upgrades. It now feels as solid as a Canon 1 series pro body, with an almost equal degree of weather proofing. 

The movie mode was the one that took the world by surprise when the 5D Mark II was announced almost 4 years ago, and while its resolution and framerates are unchanged, every else is: There's now a dedicated movie/live view switch, a headphone socket, and the user is able to set shutter speed, aperture, ISO and sound volume from the rear control dial. The video codec used is the same as the one in the 1D X, with the All-I and IPB interframe compression options, unfortunately sans the uncompressed HDMI output.

Moreover, entirelly new functionality has also been added: This is Canon's first Dslr to gain a (well thought of) HDR function, the autobracketing has gone up to 7 frames at a +/-8 EV range, there's a multiple exposure setting, and the camera can do in-house correction of chromatic aberration artifacts, light fallof and distortion correction on Jpeg files.

 

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