Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12mm f/2.0 review at Camera Hoarders: Sharpness is excellent. At F/2 the lens shows slightly softer results both centre and corner, but nothing that prevented me from using it regularly wide open.

"Olympus 12 F/2 ED lens is quite a good performer. At $700 – $800 it is not cheap, but then you get what you pay for. F/2 wideangles this small are not something that grows on trees. It’s sharp across the frame at F/2 and gets really sharp from F/2.8 to F/8. There is visible vignette at F/2 but disappears already at F/2.8 so there’s really hardly anything to complain from optical performance standpoint. Unique manual focus implementation makes this lens really desirable for . . . read more

Panasonic Lumix G X Vario 12-35mm F2.8 ASPH Power OIS lens review by Fredrik Gløckner at m43photo: This is a very good performing lens, with few flaws. It is probably the best lens I have ever used. However, it comes at a rather steep price.

"Finally, in 2012, we got the two f/2.8 zoom lenses, with the premium metal finish. The lens barrel is made of anodized metal with a purple-ish colour. This leaves me a bit unhappy. The lens barrel has two functions, in my opinion: To be solid, and to provide a good grip. With the latter in mind, why make it out of glossy metal? Other manufacturers go for a matte crinkle finish, which I think is better.

While the two kit zoom lenses above look similar, they are in fact very different. The Lumix G 14-42mm basic kit lens has a . . . read more

Panasonic G X Vario 12-35mm F/2.8 ASPH O.I.S lens (mounted on a Olympus E-M5) review by Kurt Munger: This lens is extremely impressive wide, and very good as you zoom out, with the sides being the only issue keeping the lens from being a dream come true.

Dat Purple! This is the real dark side to the alleged micro 4/3 interoperability between lenses and cameras: Nasties such as color fringing and distortion produced by Panasonic lenses are all but eliminated when used with a Panasonic camera. Not so much when it comes to Olympus cameras, and this fact can transform an otherwise excellent lens like this one, to a mediocre one. The problem is, Olympus camera users have nowhere else to turn to, Oly has focused on prime lenses, and their only  high-end zoom ones are the old Zuiko behemoths, that don't work very well-or at all, with micro 4/3 bodies. Kurt Munger however does not appear to be excessively bothered by the less than optimal results the Vario 12- . . . read more

Olympus M.ZUIKO DIGITAL 40-150mm 1:4-5.6 ED R MSC review by Sebastian Milczanowski at Photozone: From a price/performance perspective, the Olympus is a viable choice but it stays short of the higher expectations from more ambitious users.

"The Olympus M.ZUIKO DIGITAL ED 40-150mm 1:4-5.6 R is a quite good entry-level telephoto zoom lens. It may not be a cracker in terms of delivered resolution but it is no show-stopper either. The image quality is quite impressive in the low to mid portion of the zoom range. At 150mm it is somewhat weaker but not terribly so. Image distortions are usually cared about by the camera's auto-correction mechanism but technically they are only very obvious at 40mm anyway (in RAW data only). Vignetting is usually nothing to worry about either. Lateral CAs can get obvious at 40mm but they're not . . . read more

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12mm f/2.0 review by Ming Thein: Those are my only two complaints: the inaccuracy of the pseudo-manual focus clutch, and the continued minor farce of the lens hood.

"Although the lens in general well corrected, you do get the feeling that it’s on the extreme edges of what was possible with the design constraints put upon the optical designers: there’s visible CA against high contrast subjects, especially in the corners where you can get up to 2 pixels’ worth; there’s also very noticeable distortion. Fortunately, it’s fairly simple in nature – barrel with no sombrero/ moustache – and is easily correctable in ACR. Flare exists but the ZERO coating does a good job of keeping it to a minimum – even without the hood. . . . read more

Olympus M. Zuiko Digital ED 60mm f/2.8 Macro review at SLR Gear: This lens offers a very light and portable macro solution, with excellent results for sharpness, and resistance to chromatic aberration, corner shading and distortion.

"The Olympus 60mm ƒ/2.8 Macro is a solid little lens which does not add much weight to the camera. The lens has 13 elements in 10 groups: of these, one is an ED lens, two are HR lenses and one is an E-HR lens element. The lens features a seven-bladed circular aperture which stops down to ƒ/22, and as previously mentioned, takes 46mm filters. The lens is marked as splashproof, providing some level of weather resistance. . . . read more

Olympus M.zuiko 60mm Macro f/2.8 vs 75mm at Pattaya Days: If you are not interested in macro, and are prepared to pay 50% more, go for the 75mm.

"If you are not interested in macro, and are prepared to pay 50% more, go for the 75mm. The extra light gathering of F1.8 can be really useful, as well as offering creamier bokeh and a chance for thinner depth of field if such is you need. And the IQ is beyond reproach.

If you are after a macro, the 60mm will give you great macro shots, and also double as a general lens providing almost as much as the 75mm. And it’s lighter, cheaper, faster and more weather resistant. . . . read more

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 60mm f/2.8 macro lens review at TheDigitalStory: Quiet, precise and sharp, very good value.

"I rarely shot with this lens at the "default" 0.19m - Infinity setting that is highlighted in silver on the side of the barrel. I was either working close at 0.19m - 0.4m, or shooting portraits and sports at the 0.4m - Infinity setting. By working this way, I enjoyed fast autofocusing throughout the shoot. If you want to focus manually, the wide, well-dampened focusing ring is a joy to operate. In fact, it works so well in combination with the electronic viewfinder on the OM-D, that it's actually pleasurable to turn off the autofocus and work manually. I love lenses that give me this option. . . . read more

Olympus 12-50mm f/3.5-6.3 ED M.Zuiko EZ Micro 4/3 Lens review by Thom Hogan: A bit better than your usual cheapo kit lens, especially for users that shoot video.

"I consider the 12-50mm a "kit lens for videographers." Most of the weaknesses of this lens hurt still users, but not video users, plus a video user likely feels more restrained by the kit lens than a still user. The 4x zoom range gives them more flexibility than the ~3x zoom range of the regular kit lens, the silent zoom/focus is necessary for close work, and even the quasi-macro range opens up abilities that a video user would seek.

While Olympus and others have suggested this lens with the E-M5 as the perfect kit lens combination, I have reservations . . . read more

The Phoblographer recommends Lenses for Micro Four Thirds, but don't read if you're a fan of m43 zoom lenses though, because they're deemed 'mediocre at best'.

Also recommended is the Tokina reflex 300mm POS IQ challenged lens (due to mirror/reflex technology limitations), that the writer obviously thinks is better than the Panasonic 100-300mm? Yeah, right.

"For those of us who like to take pictures of small things with great magnification, or close-ups of stuff like flower blossoms, a macro lens is a must. Panasonic has the Leica-branded 45mm f2.8 to offer, while Olympus recently introduced the 60mm f2.8 (which is much smaller in reality than it seems). Both allow for 1:1 magnification, and both . . . read more

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 75mm f/1.8 Lens Review at the Phoblographer: So good, it redefines the standards at which micro four thirds lenses should be built.

"The build is the first sign of quality, but the excellence continues throughout the optics and the result is nothing short of amazing. Images are sharp, pleasing to the eye, and color pops beautifully. Weight could certainly be a concern if you’re travelling with this lens, or shooting with a smaller body like an E-P3 or an E-PM1, but the tradeoff is well worth it–a tremendously good portrait lens at what I believe to be a fair price. $899 is not exactly what I would call cheap, especially in the world of micro four thirds, but it’s an absolute bargain for a lens of this quality. If a high quality portait lens is what you’re looking for, then I have no doubt that this is the one for you." . . . read more

Olympus Digital ED 60mm f/2.8 Macro Lens Review from a guy who never shoots macro, that's Steve Huff.

"Even for a guy who has not a “Macro Guy” I feel this lens could add something to my Micro 4/3 kit. It continues the streak from Olympus with high quality super glass that seems to be created from magic lens elves. If you like to shoot Macro or get in close I can not imagine ANYONE being disappointed in this lens. It is built well, feels solid, has nice auto focus performance, is 100% silent, is sharp and even the manual focus is smooth, silky and easy to use. There is some minimal CA in certain extreme situations (high contrast with full light behind subject such as tree branch can create some purple . . . read more

Panasonic 12-35mm f/2.8 Zoom Lens Hands-On Review at The Fat Bears: The lens must be stopped down quite severely in order to produce excellent results.

As an aside, whilst the 12-35 comes with built in Panasonic Power OIS, I haven’t tried it out – I’ve been relying on Oly’s excellent 5-axis stablisation in the OM-D, although at some point I reckon I’ll give it a go.

All in all, I’m pretty happy with the results which this lens is capable of. I intend to test it out a great deal more, especially in low-light situations. I picked it up with the intention of using it as a low-light lens for events, and that’s what I’ll post about more when once I’ve given it a good go. In the meantime, here are a couple more sample images… Let me know what you think. . . . read more

Olympus M.zuiko 17mm f/1.8 review at LensTip.com: Nothing to be proud of, Olympus needs to rethink.

"This lens is not exactly a successful construction and it should have been thought out better – I write it without scruple. I could even call it ill-considered. Why? Because it repeats some features you can already find in the Micro 4/3 system. When Panasonic and Olympus companies announced the launch of a new system I thought they were going to support each other, filling in their respective gaps. Meanwhile the Olympus 1.8/17 occupies a place already taken by the Panasonic . . . read more

Panasonic Lumix G Vario 35-100mm f/2.8 X OIS review at AdmiringLight: Very, very good, but not flawless.

"The cons list above may seem a bit nitpicky to some. Especially the last point, so let me explain. The image quality of this lens is outstanding, and the lens is a worthy addition to the Micro 4/3 lineup. However, compared with the newest 70-200mm lenses from Canon and Nikon, it’s not quite going to match those stellar optics. Instead, I’d say it’s on the level of something like the original Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L IS. So, very, very good, but not flawless. Considering it’s $1,000 less than those new Canon and Nikon lenses, though, I can forgive this. Still, it’s a pricey lens at $1,499, and will really only . . . read more

Olympus M.zuiko 17mm f/1.8 VS 17mm f2.8 VS Panasonic 20mm f1.7 ASPH review by Ming Thein: We're not there yet, but it is a good start.

"That leaves us with the three native AF options. I would not buy the 17/2.8 unless size is a critical priority, or you know that you’re going to be shooting only static objects stopped down; otherwise the slow AF speed will drive you crazy. The Panasonic 20/1.7 is in a similar boat; it’s faster to focus than the 17/2.8 and optically better, but nowhere near as fast as the 17/1.8. The 20/1.7 and 17/1.8 deliver similar resolution in the center, but they render quite differently – the 20/1.7 is . . . read more

Lumix G X Vario 35-100mm f/2.8 ASPH lens review by Jordan Steele at Admiring Light: This lens finally brings a top tier telephoto zoom to the Micro 4/3 system, and I can definitely recommend this lens for the serious Micro 4/3 shooter. A great lens.

The Lens was tested with Panasonic GX1 and Olympus E-M5 bodies.

"The cons list above may seem a bit nitpicky to some. Especially the last point, so let me explain. The image quality of this lens is outstanding, and the lens is a worthy addition to the Micro 4/3 lineup. However, compared with the newest 70-200mm lenses from Canon and Nikon, it’s not quite going to match those stellar optics. Instead, I’d say it’s on the level of something like the original Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L IS. So, very, very good, but not flawless. Considering it’s $1,000 less than those new Canon and Nikon lenses, though, I can forgive this. Still, it’s a pricey lens at $1,499, and will really only cater to those who know they need an f/2.8 telephoto zoom in this range. . . . read more

Pekka Potka tests the Olympus 17mm f/1.8: Not the perfect 35mm equivalent, yet.

"The M. Zuiko 17mm lens is a nice lens to use. Small and well made. Autofocusing is lightning fast and silent. It is a joy to walk with; walk to the spot where you by experience know you get the right angle, raise the camera, shoot, walk on... Fast, unobtrusive. It also has the same, very practical pull-push focusing ring as M. Zuiko 12mm lens. And it also comes in the . . . read more

Olympus Introduces the M.ZUIKO 17mm f1.8 lens, lens hood and cap comes optional.

Yes, it is not enough that Olympus charges serious money for their always optional lens hoods, lately they've gone the optional route for the freaking lens cap too. Street price for a cap: $22-30. Add the hood for approx. $90-$100.
Anyway, the lens will be available from December, with an estimated price of $499/€449.

Olympus (US) press release. . . . read more

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 75mm f/1.8 Lens Review at Ephotozine.

Doesn't it bother you when a new, premium priced (and performing) lens comes out and it is not a) weather sealed and b)comes with no hood. And the hood costs as much as an entry kit lens. For shame Olympus. Excerpt:

"Micro Four Thirds system camera owners who are already looking at this lens probably don't need any more convincing of it's worth, but those who hadn't yet considered it may be interested to see just how well this optic performs. It's amongst . . . read more

Tokina Reflex 300mm MF Macro Lens Review at Ephotozine

A 600mm equivalent lens that boasts a constant f6.3 aperture, a diminutive size and mass, and costs just a bit more than a common kit lens? There's got to be a catch, and in this case, quite a few of them, like the issue of image quality:

"Far from being a viable replacement for a more expensive telephoto lens, what we have here is a lens that produces a certain effect, that may be of interest to some. The effect it produces can be used to great effect for the right subject, but can also spoil an otherwise good image.

. . . read more

Thoughts on the Olympus Body Cap Lens, by Simon Goldsworthy

Maybe this idea Olympus had about a body cap lens ain't so bad after all:

"Optically this lens is a little bit pants. The corners are soft and a little smeary. There is also quite a bit of vignetting. However, it’s enjoyable to shoot with because you have to shift your shooting style to compensate for the narrow (fixed) aperture and manual focus. To be fair the centre is sharp even if the corners are not." . . . read more

Panasonic 35-100 f/2.8 X OIS lens First Impression at Lens Rentals: Excellent wide, 'meh' tele end.

Maybe they set the bar too high, even though they used some of the best m43 cameras around, the E-M5 and the G5 to aid in the evaluation of this new 70-200mm equivalent lens:

"Well, it didn’t quite meet my expectations, at least not at the 100mm end which is where my main interest was. But I’d set the bar pretty high. . . . read more

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 60mm f/2.8 review by Pekka Potka: Close to a perfect macro lens.

"M. Zuiko 60mm f/2.8 Macro is a great macro lens. Small, light, splash proof and has very fast and silent internal focusing with focus limiters. As a macro lens, it is actually difficult to find any negative things to say about it. Sharpness and contrast are at very high level. RAW images opened into Lightroom 4 do not suffer from distortions or fringing and CA is a non-issue. I have not compared this lens head to head with other macro lenses than Zuiko D. 50mm f/2 Macro lens and . . . read more

Pekka Potka tests the Olympus 15mm f8 'Body cap lens'

But he has run out of colour, so, only black and white pics. He doesn't like it a lot either:

"Aperture f/8 is far too dim to be usable (without flash) casually in a traditional P&S style whenever, if you expect normally sharp images. You really have to set your eye and mind to f/8 and work with the consequensies of it, namely blur. Or then . . . read more

Tokina Reflex 300mm F6.3 MF MACRO review at DC Watch

Being a Japanese site, we'll stick to the Google translate version, which is funnier than the actual lens:

"On a sense of resolution, contrast with those.  Not seen, such as coma, such as noticeable, but it is also the lesser limb darkening.  A vivid image of the periphery of the screen as well, is a depiction satisfactory as a mirror lens.  These materials . . . read more

Tokina Reflex 300mm f/6.3 MF Macro Lens hands-on at the Phoblographer

"Focusing the lens is fairly simple to do. All you need to do is keep in mind the 600mm focal length (equivalent) and just pay very close attention to your potential subject.

Oh also, it does this really cool doughnut-shaped-bokeh-thinger. That is characteristic of most mirror lenses, and it should be . . . read more

Tokina Reflex 300mm f/6.3 MF Macro Lens hands-on at the Luminous Landscape

"I spent an afternoon shooting with the Lumix 100-300mm at 300mm, and comparing results against the Tokina 300mm mirror lens. It was akin to a battle between the halt and lame. The Lumix shows a bit better resolution but also some significant chromatic aberration (purple fringing) while the Tokina has no CA but also lower contrast. The resolution of the . . . read more

Panasonic LUMIX G X VARIO 35-100mm F2.8 Review at the Photography Blog

The price may be bringing tears to the eyes, but the performance is really up there with the good 70-200mm f2.8 group:

"Optically the lens is a great performer. At all focal lengths, wide open at f/2.8 the center sharpness is perfectly acceptable, but for edge sharpness it's best to stop down by two f-stops for optimum results. Chromatic aberrations are only noticeable . . . read more

Panasonic 100-300/4-5.6 Lumix G Vario review by Ming Thein: Among the blinds, this is the one-eyed king of m43 super tele zoom lenses.

"So what’s the 100-300 useful for? To be honest, I bought it out of curiosity and the lack of a telephoto solution for any of my other systems. It’s actually a pretty good option for reach in a pinch, especially when you’re not sure you’re going to need it – and don’t want to carry around a large 300, 400 or 500mm supertelephoto. The combination of lens and OM-D doesn’t occupy much space in the bag at all. Aside from slightly reduced optical quality and a slower aperture, the biggest . . . read more

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