Nikon uder fire for catering to both Wildlife photographers and hunters.

The Independent's Hannah Martin reports:

"Nikon, one of photography’s most respected names, faces a backlash from within the industry for portraying itself as a friend of wildlife photography while making sights for rifles for big game trophy hunters in the US and Africa.

The Japanese camera manufacturer makes a rifle scope designed specifically for killing large game, the £170 “Monarch African”.

Nikon’s marketing literature boasts that the scope is perfect “for those seeking their dangerous game adventure on the dark continent” and is “the proven choice for dangerous big game hunting”, adding: “Africa has long been a continent of dreams for hunters around the world.”"

A black bear gets curious about Dean Swartz Nikon DSLR, decides to try its skills at photography. (And gave up soon afterwards when it probably decided that a mirrorless is what it really wants)

What no touch and shoot? It is mirrorless for me from now on baby!

"A Black Bear decides to become a Photographer. What do you do when you're taking photos of a black bear in the woods with expensive photography equipment and the bear starts coming towards you? Run of course. But if you're a true photographer, and have an extra camera, you stop and document what happens after you leave.

The photographer, said "While photographing a black bear sow and her three spring cubs near Ely, Minnesota, I noticed a . . . read more

Lion steals, tries to eat a Canon 5D Mark II and a 16-35 f/2.8L II lens. Camera was announced dead on the spot, but the lens survived the ordeal.

Lion chews on a canon 5dmk2 camera. Copyright 2012 Ed Hetherington Photography

"I brought a remote control and a small stand to Zimbabwe so that I could capture some animal images from a unique “on the ground perspective”. I used the setup for some images of elephants and African wild dogs and most animals ignored the camera after or at most gave it a quick glance.

When a lioness brought down a buffalo about 400 meters from our camp approached to get some images of her with her kill. The lioness walked away to get a drink of water in a nearby stream and we placed the camera near the carcass so that she would walk past it on the way back to feed. (The long lens and camera angle in first image makes it the remote camera seem closer to the kill than it actually was). . . . read more

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