Interesting Retro review: The Nikon S3 Rangefinder camera, by Ken Rockwell

What is really interesting is that Nikon-in a streak of sentimentality-revived this model 13 years ago, as a Year 2000 Limited Edition Celebration model. Strangely the S(P) Rangefinder camera was revived yet again, in 2005.  Even stranger,, that was the third time Nikon revived this Lazarus-on-Steroids of a camera, the first one was in 1964 for the XVIII Tokyo Olympic Games, the camera was made only in black, and came with a titanium curtain shutter. 

Nikon still makes two film cameras, the F6, and the FM10, and keeps much of the older film body tooling & machinery in a mothballed state. In 4 years Nikon will celebrate its centenary, and there's no doubt in my mind that we'll see yet another revival of a classic Nikon film design. Or maybe a totally new Nikon F7? 

"The life-size finder is excellent, however it's always cluttered with all the framelines at the same time. It's fine for use . . . read more

Ming Thein helps you pick up a film camera, small or big, or very big.

Ming chooses between a wide selection of formats and brands, there's of course the Leica and the Hasselblad, but also saner stuff like Contax and Nikon F:

"The obvious choice here is a Leica M of some description – M6es are a good place to start; they’re reasonably priced in the US$1,000 range, relatively modern, still serviceable, and have a meter. They do have a known rangefinder flare issue that made the RF patch difficult to see under some lighting conditions; modifications to later versions solved this. The M7 adds aperture priority but requires batteries to operate; personally, the MP would be my pick – fully manual, wonderfully tactile, all speeds work without batteries, but you do have the benefit of a meter if you’re not sure. Avoid the Bessas unless you shoot wide – the rangefinder base length is too short to accurately focus very fast or telephoto lenses; but they are the only cameras with built in 21mm frame lines . . . read more

12 classic cameras that don't look like cameras, by David Galbraith at Gizmodo.

Is a miniaturized pigeon camera a classic? I think not, I suppose he meant 'old' instead. Interesting tidbit: The only company of those listed still in existence today, is the Czech-American​ Meopta, makers of a wide range of optics. Their Pankopta camera listed here is a panoramic one, meant mostly for airborne operations. A functional A+ grade one, fetches sums above $100K

"One of the negative things about technological progress is when something that was originally intricate and mechanical becomes a ubiquitous piece of cheap technology. This happened in the 70s with watches and more recently has happened with cameras. A modern day spy camera is not that interesting, but the miniature ones here are, similarly the wide range of hardware solutions create much more design diversity in early cameras, from the giant 900lb box camera to the . . . read more

A Possum tries to operate a movie camera, Northern Australia, 1943.

Photo taken in August of 1943. The location is Northern Australia, and it depicts a ring tailed possum examining a camera belonging to the Australian Department of information. Shot by young Department photographer Harold George Dick with a Graflex Speed Graphic camera, who was killed in an airplane crash in December 1943 while returning from an assignment at the Pacific war theater, more specifically, the Battle of Arawe. A couple of his war images can be found here and here.

Angelina Jolie goes nuts shooting herself with a Hasselblad camera. (Gallery Inside)

Angelina Jolie and a Hasselblad film camera self portraits, 1

Famed Miami-born fashion photographer Alexei Hay decided to let Angelina Jolie do the work herself for once, and now we're certain she can pursue a job as a portrait photographer if her actress her career flunks in the future. All photographs shot with a Hasselblad medium format film camera and a mirror. On a second thought, maybe she's just posing as a photographer?Shooting Film has the story:

"Angelina Jolie is an Oscar-winning actress who has become popular by taking on the title role in the "Lara Croft" series of blockbuster movies. Off-screen, Jolie has become prominently involved in international charity projects, especially . . . read more

David Douglas Duncan's camera fetches a new record setting price for a Leica: 1.68 Million Euros.

David Douglas Duncan holding his Leica M3D with a Tele lens. (Getty images)

Even if his name won't ring a bell with you, his images have been seen by generations all over the globe. Duncan began using his Leica at the onset of the Vietnam war (while on a Life magazine assignment), and he's been with a Leica ever since. He is also well known for his Korea war pictures, taken with a Rolleiflex, and for his close friendship with Pablo Picasso. Saturday's sale also included thousands of NASA vintage photographs and slides that went for 200,000 euros, and  a batch of photographs by Russia's space exploration agency that went for 60,000 euros. . . . read more

BBC Magazine: Did the Lomo camera save film photography?

"It was a nervous time for film photography when digital cameras took off in the 1990s, and seemed set to take over entirely. But with some help from Vladimir Putin - then deputy mayor of St Petersburg - the little Lomo camera became a retro cult classic, and showed film had a bright future.

In 1991, a group of Austrian art students on a trip to nearby Prague found, in a photographic shop, a curious camera. . . . read more

Canon 5D Mark II plus 1919 Piccolette Contessa-Nettel folding camera makes a medium format view camera

Contraption by Jason Bognacki. Surprisingly sharp images, but flare is out of control, while contrast in on a pretty low level. The lens is a Zeiss Ikon 7.5mm f/6.3. No  info yet about the Contessa+Canon 5D MkII mating process.

Kodak to discontinue three slide films: E100VS, E100G and Elite Chrome Extra Color 100

Kodak is continuing on its steady diet, this time the fat to be trimmed are 3 of the EKTACHROME color reversal films:

"Kodak Discontinuation Notice

DISCONTINUATION NOTICE — . . . read more

The La Sardina Camera, Western Edition by Lomography

Lomography Press Release

The Lomographic Society Proudly

Presents

THE LA SARDINA WESTERN EDITION . . . read more

Analogue to Digital: Reflecta MF5000 scanner review at BJP

"The mounted 35mm transparency holder is a single piece unit accepting four frames. It presented no problems with clean Kodachrome mounted slides, but E6 reversal materials in a variety of branded card mounts proved more tricky; a sharp bladed modeling knife is an essential extra tool required for cutting 0.5-1mm off renegade mounts to make them fit. . . . read more

A Photographer's Eulogy for Eastman Kodak at Luminous Landscape

Is Kodak aware that people are writing eulogies left and right? Is the company even aware of its death? No, not really, according to them they are 'restructuring' and 'focusing on core strategies' and 'enforcing the transformation to an all digital company' and stuff like that. Kodak, welcome to the purgatory, Agfa and Polaroid will be your guides. . . . read more

Fujifilm: film sales decline is slowing @ Tech Radar

"It's fair to say that in recent months and years, there has been a serious resurgence in the popularity of analogue film, with companies like Lomography cashing on in on the trend with a range of plastic cameras that produce unpredictable results.  . . . read more

35-foot long film camera takes photos that are two stories tall @ DVICE

"The camera alone is so large "it barely fits into a truck" and can capture photos in "epic detail" that will be a thousand times sharper than even the sharpest digital photos.

Famous Black and White Photos turned into colour

The colourizing is done by Swedish artist Sanna Dullaway. In her own words: "I did not want to "improve" nor "replace" the photos I DID colourize as some of you may think. I just wanted to show you a new perspective of the black & white old world, it used to be in colour, too. I thought famous photos would touch most hearts. Focus on the photos, not me." . . . read more

The Most Important Developments in Photography @ LensRentals

Sigh. Kodak is directly or indirectly involved in 4 of these 10 developments. Ain't it sad?

"In my last article I listed the three most important developments in photography. Then someone pointed out that I’d made an error. I mean, I may have misspoken.  Wait, I mean I was less correct than I might have been. I listed the invention of the camera first (that part is pretty hard to argue . . . read more

Harman Titan Pinhole 5x4 Camera Kit Review @ Ephotozine

FTA: "It's hard to believe in the digital age of megapixels, fantastic lenses and fast computing that there is still a market for getting back to the absolute basics of photography, but surprisingly this is the case. There is really nothing simpler than a pinhole camera as it's essentially a lightproof box with a tiny hole in one side which throws light onto a piece of film on the opposite side, and this review looks at the latest contender in this growing niche market." . . . read more

Building the ultimate digital photography system

If you can spare some $30.000 and have a strong back, maybe this is something for you.  Michaeil Reichman from Luminous-landscape.com once again gives us insights from the world of digital pros. From the article:

The end for the CONTAX brand.

Kyocera Corporation (President: Yasuo Nishiguchi, hereafter called "Kyocera") has decided to terminate CONTAX-branded camera business.

Tessar Lens

In 1902 Tessar-The “Eagle eye” was introduced. Using only 4 lens elements, two cemented doublet and two outer elements, Tessar delivered superior performance unachieved before and became the most famous photo lens of all times. Its name “Tessar” means four “Tessares” in Greek.

History of ZEISS

  Founded in 17 November 1846 by Carl Friedrich Zeiss Carl Friendrich Zeiss (born in 11 Sept. 1816 in Weimar , died in 3 Dec. 1888 in Jena),  
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