Electronic Viewfinder with Interchangeable Lens or mirrorless interchangeable-lens camera

Sony NEX-5R review ay Ali Jennings at the Tech Radar: The Sony NEX-5R is not only a refinement of the Sony NEX-5N, but a significant upgrade.

Ali tested the camera with the 18-55mm kit zoom lens:

"The Sony NEX-R5 shows how compact system cameras are really coming into their own. The design doesn't have to rely on retro chic, but instead uses modern research and development to create a compact body shape that both fits the electronics and also feels comfortable to hold. The merging of the tilting screen design from the Sony NEX-F3 and the control dial feature of the Sony NEX-7 make this a very user-friendly camera for both the beginner and intermediate photographer. . . . read more

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 45mm f/1.8 prime lens review at Camera Labs: This is superb performance made all the more remarkable by the tiny dimensions and relatively affordable price tag.

Gordon Laing is the reviewer, and he took the unusual step to use the Panasonic GX1 as the test camera: 

"The Olympus 45mm f1.8 is arguably one of the best lenses for the Micro Four Thirds system, whether you're using an Olympus or Panasonic body. This lens is so small and light you'll hardly know you're carrying it around, yet is capable of delivering industry-leading performance with pin-sharp details across the entire frame right into the extreme corners. With an effective focal length of 90mm and a maximum aperture of f1.8, the lens is ideal for portrait work and can deliver sharp detail on the subject with a satisfyingly blurred background behind it. Likewise for closer subjects down to the nearest focusing . . . read more

Fujifilm X-E1 review by Christopher Snow at Digital Camera Info: "The Fujifilm X-E1 is all of the fun and none of the frivolity of the X-Pro1"

"The X-Pro1 was 2012’s most fun new camera, but if you’re one of those people that thinks saving money is fun too, Fujifilm has the answer. By reducing the X-E1’s footprint and stripping out the novel—but unhelpful—hybrid viewfinder, the company has shaved $400 off the X-Pro1’s already-reduced price tag, all without sacrificing much of that model’s stellar performance.

For better or worse, our most enthusiastic praise is reserved not for the camera itself, but for the new kit lens. When the X-mount debuted, Fujifilm showed a commitment to high quality glass with its first three prime offerings, but many wondered if this performance would extend to a zoom lens. Now we know the answer. The X-E1’s 18-55mm kit lens is almost exactly as sharp as the XF 35mm f/1.4, which is really quite amazing for a zoom lens. We only wish the . . . read more

System Camera Production increased 34% in volume, 43% in value during 2012, compact camera production shows further decline.

japan system camera production increased during 2012

A few notes: These numbers come from CIPA, Japan's Camera & Imaging Products Association, and as thus, production numbers from China and Korea are not included. However, seeing the onslaught of Chinese branded digicams in markets everywhere, my guess is that China's compact camera output has not declined at all, and since Samsung's latest earning report stated a slight volume increase too, the Cassandras predicting the imminent demise of the compact camera segment can just pack up and go home. Also, the biggest increase in volume occurred in Europe, maybe photography is a good outlet for austerity related stress :)

Chris Cheesman at Amateur Photographer reports:
Production of interchangeable-lens cameras rose 34% in 2012 and shipments of lenses broke through the 30 million unit mark, Japanese trade figures have revealed. But total digital camera shipments – including compacts – dropped 15%, according to Japan's Camera & Imaging Products Association (CIPA).

. . . read more

Tamron 14-150mm F/3.5-5.8 Di III VC vs. Olympus M.Zuiko 14-150mm f/4.0-5.6 vs. Panasonic Vario HD 14-140mm f/4-5.8 ASPH MEGA OIS hands-off comparison.

micro 4/3 superzoom shootout, tamron vs olympus vs panasonic

For some reasons only known to Tamron's managers, the company chooses to enter the micro 4/3 format with a 14-150mm zoom, closely matching the popular Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 14-150mm f/4.0-5.6 and the elder Panasonic Lumix G Vario HD 14-140mm f/4-5.8 ASPH MEGA OIS lenses.

Now, if they had bothered to shave a millimeter or two off the wide end, it would have been really exciting news, but as it stands now, the micro 4/3 mount is served by no less than 11 zoom lenses all sharing the 14mm wide end. Is there enough playing field for the New kid?  . . . read more

Fujifilm finally posts firmware updates for the X-E1, X-Pro1 cameras and the XF 35mm lens, hiccups reported by users.

Some quick notes on user reactions: Apparently the XF 35mm firmware upgrade makes the lens noisier in operation, at least that's what many people report.
The X-E1 update does not result in as dramatic AF speed improvements as the earlier X-Pro1 update did. The camera DOES focus more accurately now, especially with the 18-55mm kit lens, but many users claim it does so at the expense of speed. And finally, one big issue Fujifilm did not resolve is the much wanted minimum shutter speed at auto Iso setting. Finally, Rico Pfirstinger has posted some nice tips about firmware upgrading on Fujifilm bodies: . . . read more

Olympus M. Zuiko Digital ED 60mm f2.8 Macro scores at DXO Mark: For super-sharp outdoor close-ups and video.

The Olympus M.zuiko 60mm macro scored a slight bit better than the Panasonic Leica DG Macro-Elmarit 45mm F2.8 ASPH OIS lens, while costing less money and offering weather sealing on top of that.

"With strong performance across most of the DxOMark tests and a video-friendly MSC AF motor as well as a weather-resistant design, the Olympus M. Zuiko Digital ED 60mm f2.8 Macro is a good choice for outdoor macro shooting, such as nature portraits or close-up videos.  Compared to its main (and more expensive) competitor, the Panasonic Leica DG Macro-Elmarit 45mm F2.8 ASPH OIS, it offers better quality for the money, delivering category-leading vignetting performance among Micro Four Thirds prime lenses as well as excellent sharpness. . . . read more

Olympus releases Redesigned Olympus M.Zuiko ED 75-300mm f4.8-6.7 II Superzoom tele lens

I guess this is what Olympus users wanted, a new, dark n'plastic 75-300mm lens. At least it looks like a proper lens now, and the addition of ZERO coating won't hurt either. Reading the press release issued by Olympus, i wonder what they mean by saying that the lens is redesigned to match the E-M5 and the Pen series cameras. So, what did the previous lens match, the drapes?

Olympus Press Release

CENTER VALLEY, Pa., January 29, 2013 – Olympus makes high-performance super-telephoto shooting more accessible than ever before by introducing the affordable M.ZUIKO ED 75-300mm f4.8-6.7 II lens (35mm equivalent 150-600mm). Olympus has redesigned the lens to match the distinctive OM-D E-M5®   and PEN®Micro Four Thirds® series cameras and added a new advanced ZERO (Zuiko Extra-low Reflection Optical) coating to keep scratches off, and . . . read more

Olympus OM-D EM-5 epic review by Nasim Mansurov: Without a doubt, the Olympus OM-D E-M5 is the best mirrorless camera on the market today. I just wish I checked it out earlier.

And I wish i had discovered this post by Nasim earlier. As far as reviews of the EM-5 go, this is one of the top 3 there is, the other two being Thom Hogan's recent essay and of course Richard Butler's technical at DPReview. Nasims reviews strike the perfect balance between lyrical and tehnical, and just for this, we forgive him for making fool predictions :)

"Until I came across the Olympus OM-D E-M5. From the day I started using the OM-D E-M5, I just fell in love with it. Everything just felt right about it – excellent image quality, incredibly fast autofocus, wide lens selection, superior ergonomics with a boatload of customization options. Suddenly, it just felt like the camera I had been wanting to own and use all these years. My only doubt was the smaller sensor size – for a while I thought that I would go with a

. . . read more

Metabones Speed booster on a Fuji X-Pro1 with some Leica Glass and a lot of shake, by Daniele Cametti Aspri at (of course) SteveHuff.com

​I believe there is something special about the crowd of photographers posting at SteveHuff.com. I will not delve into the kind of 'special' I'm reffering to, but, in any case, here's a review-or more properly, user experience, with the Metaboners Speed Booster mounted on the Fujifilm X-Pro1 and used with a bunch of (of course) Leica lenses: Leica R Elmarit 19 /2.8, Summicron 35/2, Summicron 50/2 and a Summicron 90/2. Daniele does not go into the very specifics of image quality issues, So I tried to pixel-peep the mostly blurred and noisy pictures she provides with the review, and came out empty handed. And then, there's the Colombus egg:

"But last night when I saw the Metabones Speed Booster ad everything was so clear. It is a Columbus egg! If you cannot have a full sensor size why don’t you reduce the image circle of a full frame lens to an aps c size sensor? The effects are . . . read more

Little Olympus Body Cap Lens 15mm f/8.0 go to the DXO Mark playground, gets called 'cute' by the grownups.

Why read a review of the body cap lens? It costs less that some of Oly's lens hoods, is comes at around the same size as a regular body cap, but is a lens. Excellent for photography training too, as every prime lens it makes you use your feet instead of a zoom range.  I gave it as a Christmas gift to a fat relative of mine, and now he's looking healthier than ever!

"No photographer buying a $49, 9mm long body cap lens is expecting optical perfection. Instead this lens is a bit of fun, a curiosity, a point and shoot option that’s a bit quirky and doesn’t cost much money.  The limited focusing, fixed 15mm focal . . . read more

Tamron 14-150mm F/3.5-5.8 Di III VC lens for micro 4/3 announced. No info on price and availabily yet.

Tamron announces the development of the company's first Micro Four Thirds high-power zoom lens, equivalent to 28-300mm in the 35mm full-frame format

Tamron 14-150mm F/3.5-5.8 Di III VC (Model C001) with Tamron's proprietary VC (Vibration Compensation)* mechanism and sophisticated metal finish in two colors - black and silver

Product features:
With one LD (Low Dispersion) glass element, two molded-glass aspherical elements and one hybrid aspherical element, Tamron's new Micro Four Thirds high-power zoom lens delivers leading-edge high image quality by thoroughly compensating for aberrations.
The ingenious optical design achieves a compact body with a filter diameter of just 52mm despite being equipped with the Tamron's highly regarded VC (Vibration Compensation) mechanism. . . . read more

Sigma greatly expands its Art series lineup, announces 4 new entries: 3 Mirrorless and one Dslr lens.

Whoever thought the CP+ event would be a minor one-beyond the cheapo inexpensive digicam crap range, will have to rethink. We're to the tune of 9 new lenses announced so far, and Sigma contributes the heavy metal part: 4 new 'Art' series lenses, all made with Aluminum bodies and fitted with brass bayonets. You may recognize the Sigma 19mm F2.8 DN and Sigma 30mm F2.8 DN names, but the 60mm F2.8 DN lens is a totally new entity. All three lenses share the metal construction  and updated optics, come in silver or black color, and will be available in micro 4/3 and Sony E mount versions. They also share lack of information by Sigma regarding availability and price.

As for the fourth lens, its an update to the venerable 30mm f1.4 DC lens announced back in 2005. The newcomer is compatible with Sigma's USB dock, and completely overhauled, inside out. It will come in Sigma, Canon and Nikon mounts at an unknown date for an unknown price. . . . read more

More specs revealed about the Olympus XZ-10 camera and M.Zuiko Digital ED 75-300mm f/4.8-6.7 Mk. II Lens.

Lens first: Everything appears unchanged, except for the new ZERO coating (ZUIKO Extra-low Reflection Optical Coating), same as the one that adorns many of Olympus Prime Lenses. Availability set to March 2013. The lens is also slightly redesigned, it looks a bit less like a designer flower-vase now and more like a proper lens. 

As for the XZ-10, it is a smaller, lighter and cheaper successor to the similarly looking XZ-2, with little else in common. The lens is now a 5x optical zoom of 26-130mm F1.8-2.7, and the sensor is very sadly a smaller 1/2.3" 12 Megapixel story, that kinda puts this cam out of the 'prosumer' range we're covering at Estiasis. If this digicam is still of any interest to you, grab your Google transgorbler and head over to Digicame.info for the rest of the spec list. . . . read more

Thom Hogan finally finishes his Olympus E-M5 review: I trust it for the type of shooting i normally do.

I can really see why it took him so long. There are no charts here, no Iso trains, no technical sections, heck not even images (except for one), but in this review they are not needed. It is evident that Thom has poured a lot of labour into this, and reading it will give a better picture of what the Olympus E-M5 really is, better than any review out there.

"This was a tough review to write. Indeed, it's taken me longer than it should have because there have been a series of small things that I wanted to be sure of before committing to them on the site. On the one hand, it was clear to me that I had started carrying the E-M5 instead of a DX DSLR when I needed to go light and small. On the other hand, those menus and options can be frustratingly dense and confusing. Was I perhaps just favoring the light and small and putting up with the complexity? It really takes time to answer that question, and thus the long germination of this review. . . . read more

Pentax launches Q10 limited Evangelion NERV edition, for Japan only, for Mushroom lovers only.

Pentax does what it best can with the Q10, outing it in yet another color scheme. 1,500 of each hallucinogens will be made, to be sold in Japan only, with the usual kit lens, and custom packaging of equally epic colonization. Each camera has its own name of course: PENTAX Q10 Evangelion model TYPE00: Ray, PENTAX Q10 Evangelion model TYPE01 and PENTAX Q10 Evangelion model TYPE02: Asuka. Deliveries will begin in April, and for those of you not dazzled enough, here's the Press Release chewed by Google Translator:

"PENTAX Corporation Ricoh Imaging (President: Noboru Akahane) are: limited quantity of 1500 each set, collaborative model "PENTAX Q10 Evangelion Model" of digital SLR cameras to commemorate the release of "Evangelion Q" Three types of will be . . . read more

Lindsay Dobson writes about her impressions of the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-50mm F3.5-6.3 EZ lens, and impressed she is.

This kit lens may come out mauled by most the reviewers, but a minority like Lindsay-and others, see it otherwise. It may not be the optically best mirrorless kit lens there is (that distinction should probably go to the Fujinon XF 18-55mm), nor the cheapest, BUT, it is sharp enough, has a good zoom range, and is unbeatable when it comes to features., the 'Jack of all trades-master of none' equivalent of lenses.

And for those buying the E-M5 and get rid of this kit lens within 5 minutes because they read a bad review of it, just try it first, will ya? You get Weather sealing, 24-100mm range, power zoom and macro mode, all in one convenient package. Too dark for you? Just bump up the Iso and you're set. Don't believe me? Check out Lindsay's pics, many of these are shot at Iso 1250-1600:

"But the question got me thinking, and I asked myself if there might be situations where the Olympus M Zuiko ED 12-50mm 1:3.5-6.3 EZ would prove useful to me. And actually, the answer is yes. . . . read more

New Panasonic Lumix G Vario 14-42mm f/3.5-5.6 II ASPH MEGA OIS lens revealed, set to launch in March.

Panasonic is set to unveil yet another slow and cheap kit lens, their forth micro 4/3 lens in this zoom range. The previous 14-42mm lens was updated to 'HD' status via firmware back in September, the new one comes HD ready out of the box, complete with the sticker. In Panasonic terms HD is:

" Specifically these HD lenses excel in tracking focus in video recording while offering silent auto focus and exposure control. In addition, there is enhanced stability of O.I.S. (Optical Image Stabilizer) in video recording"

Furthermore, the new lens is downsized compared to its predecessor, in every dimension: Its lighter, smaller, and takes smaller filters too (46mm vs 52mm). Price will remain unchanged, availability date is set to March 2013.

Steve Huff reviews the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 17mm f/1.8 Pancake lens and finds beauty where others find mediocrity.

"This one is easy. This lens has the build, the speed, the feel, the looks, the design and the performance in IQ that makes it a no brainer for your Olympus Micro 4/3 camera (especially the E-M5). If you shoot a Panasonic camera I can not say how the lens does as I did not test it on a Panasonic body but on the E-M5 it rocks just as much as their other premium lenses. . . . read more

Pentax Q10 review at the Tech Radar: Those in pursuit of the best image quality for their money, while retaining the flexibility of interchangeable lenses, will be better served by camera with a larger sensor, such as the Sony NEX-F3

All fine and dandy when it comes to describing the body and features of the Q10, but the image quality is a whole other issue. A reputable site can't say it outright, so I'll step in and say what they think: It just plainly sucks, a camera not to be taken seriously. Even Pentax themselves thinks somewhere along these lines, designating the Q lenses as 'Toy Lenses'. 

The Pentax Q10, like its predecessor, is quite an interesting camera. With it being no bigger than many other advanced compact cameras, yet able to accept interchangeable lenses, it fills the gap between traditional advanced compact digital cameras and larger mirrorless camera systems well. The price is reasonable too. At £379.99/US$529.99 (around AU$579) with the standard 5-15mm lens, it's competitively priced when compared to rivals, such as Canon's PowerShot S110. . . . read more

5 reasons why you need an 85mm lens, at DigitalRev TV.

Kai W chooses the Canon EF 85mm f/1.2L II USM lens as a showcase for the 85mm necessity. Coming up: 5 reasons why you need a pinhole lens.

"Carrying on from "5 reasons you need a 50mm lens" and "5 reasons why you need a 35mm lens", we are giving you 5 reasons why you need a bokehlicioius 85mm lens!"

Panasonic Lumix G 20mm f/1.7 ASPH VS 30mm f/2.8 EX DN Lens sharpness comparison by Fredrik Gløckner

From my own findings, there's the issue of Sigma's much lower CA and purple fringing when used on Olympus bodies. In any case, the Sigma is an automatic buy anyway, due to its current very low price.

"We see that the Lumix G 20mm f/1.7 has an impressive level of sharpness, even wide open. The Sigma 19mm, on the other hand, needs a bit of stopping down before reaching the same level of sharpness. At f/2.8, the 19mm lens is a tad bit dull, even in the centre of the image frame. This finding is consistent with other tests I have seen. Generally, it is observed that the Sigma 19mm lens is not the sharpest at f/2.8, and improves when stopped down to f/4 and f/5.6. Stopping down beyond f/5.6 does generally not add anything to the overall sharpness, but does give you more depth of focus (DoF). If you need a deep DoF, it may still be wise to stop down to f/8 or even further, but this will give you slightly worse sharpness at pixel level.

. . . read more

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 75mm f/1.8 review and DXO Mark score: This is best lens DxOMark have tested for the Micro Four Thirds hybrid camera system.

"The Olympus M.ZUIKO DIGITAL ED 75mm f/1.8 is best lens DxOMark have tested for the Micro Four Thirds hybrid camera system. Available for both Olympus and Panasonic Micro Four Thirds cameras it’s an excellent choice for portraits, sports or low-light photography but costing $899, or $975 including the lens hood, it’s not cheap. Money aside however this lens delivers good results for a Micro Four Thirds lens in all DxOMark Lens Metric Scores and with a Sharpness Score of 11P-Mpix it’s the sharpest lens available for this system. . . . read more

Sony NEX-F3 review at IR: While experienced photographers may find the Sony NEX-F3 rather too simplified, and the performance in some areas-especially for raw shooting-to be a bit limiting, it's a great choice for an entry-level mirrorless camera.

Dave takes a look at the bottom end offerings in the mirrorless price scale-before it gets occupied by 'Polaroids' and 'Kodaks'. As usual in a Imaging Resource camera review, there's an excellent accompanying print quality section.

"In late 2011, Sony's NEX-C3 compact system camera brought the versatility of interchangeable-lens shooting and the size advantage of a NEX-series mirrorless design into the hands of more photographers. The Sony NEX-F3 follows in the footsteps of that model, and while its new stair-stepped grip design makes it look quite different, it retains much of what we appreciated about its predecessor, while bringing some worthwhile improvements.

Key among these for consumer photographers is its new articulation mechanism for the rear-panel LCD, which now lets it . . . read more

Panasonic Lumix G X Vario 35-100mm f/2.8 ASPH POWER O.I.S Lens review by Ivo Freriks at Camera Stuff Review: Given the optical performances and the high quality of construction, this lens is certainly not expensive.

The Lens was tested with  Olympus E-M5 and Panasonic GH3 body. 

"The Panasonic 35-100 mm delivers sharp images across all focal lengths from full aperture to aperture 8. Above that, the resolution decreases as a result of diffraction. This is the best micro-43 zoom lens we have reviewed to date, with the Panasonic 12-35 mm yielding more or less equivalent results (but at a different focal length range). In the graph with Imatest values at the right below, you can see how beautifully high and constant the resolution is. The images are measurably sharper in the center, with the maximum being located at aperture 4 to 5.6. Nevertheless, with the naked eye, the difference in resolution between the corners and the center is not visible." . . . read more

Kenny Good and the Weapons Of Mass Production try to find out the best Dslr-for video, under $1.000: Canon T4i with 18-55mm kit lens VS. Sony NEX-6 with 16-50mm kit lens VS. Panasonic GH2 with 14-15mm kit lens, both stock and with Flowmotion v2.02 hack.

Yes, the the very same nuts from Crisis Labs reviews with the bats, and semi-nude models and all that. They take on a slightly more serious and hi-tech tone in this review, with RC Helicopters, IR suits, and... bats.

"The Sony actually did quite well, and if size (for travel) is a concern, I'd suggest this one.  It's just a hair behind I think in the image metrics, but not in a huge way.  The focus issue did drive me crazy.  Maybe there's a menu option I didn't see that prevents it from going to sleep.  I actually had to reshoot the sharpness (helicopter) comparison because it did that same focus thing to me.  That's why when it did it again for the dancing, I decided to leave it in the video that way.  It has focus peaking (that shows you a highlighted version of in-focus areas on the display) which really helps with video, and I doubt this issue would ever come up when shooting stills.  It's a solid camera, very similar to Canon in image quality, great if you're a space-conscious traveller. . . . read more

Sigma Super lens deal comes to Europe too: 2 Sigma primes at 99 Euros each, the 19mm f/2.8 EX DN and 30mm f/2.8 EX DN, available in both micro 4/3 and NEX mounts.

Sigma extends its 'prime lenses at half the price' deal to Europe, too, prices start at just 99 Euros per lens!
The lenses on offer are the Sigma 19mm f/2.8 EX DN and the Sigma 30mm f/2.8 EX DN, available in micro 4/3 and NEX mounts. Their reviews have generally been very positive ones, and sure as heck they're worth their price. Most of the European dealers have updated their prices, in case you cannot find one, check this link on Sigma's page for a dealer list.

Sony introduces two new NEX lenses: the 20mm f/2.8 pancake, and the 18-200mm F3.5-6.3 OSS Powered Telephoto Zoom Lens

The Sony NEX mount is no longer the one with more cameras than lenses. Since we first wrote that, a year ago, Sony has unveiled a handful of new glassware, including the fantastic 10-18mm f/4.0 OSS. Today they unveil another Pancake, the not very ambitious 20mm f/2.8 and the motorized E 18-200mm OSS Power Zoom, a lens that previously existed as the kit lens of the NEX-VG900 video camera. On compatible Sony camcorders the lens can be zoomed via rockers on the body, making up for some nice smooth & steady zooming action. On the other hand the 20mm f/2.8 is in no way remarkable, except for its relatively high price.  . . . read more

Panasonic Lumix G Leica DG Summilux 25mm f/1.4 ASPH lens review by Kurt Munger: The Panasonic Leica DG Macro Elmarit 45mm F/2.8 ASPH turned in a nice performance; there really isn't much to complain about

The PanaLeica lens was tested on a Olympus E-M5 body. 

"The Panasonic Leica DG Macro Elmarit 45mm F/2.8 ASPH turned in a nice performance; there really isn't much to complain about.  Pluses include: low light fall off-even wide open: lens doesn't extend when focusing: lateral color fringing is well controlled: very sharp throughout most of the image area at F/4-5.6: a focus limiter switch; and image stabilization, although that's not very important if you have a newer Olympus camera with 5 axis stabilization control. . . . read more

Nikon AFS DX Micro Nikkor 40mm f/2.8G lens review by Markus Stamm at Photo Zone: Until Nikon offers a native macro lens for the CX mount, the AF-S DX 40/2.8 G is the most affordable AF lens to explore macro photography with a Nikon 1 series camera.

This is a rather interesting review, the lens is tested with the FT-1 adapter on a Nikon 1 V1 body, and that transforms the Micro-Nikkor 40mm to something of a short tele 108mm macro lens:

"The Nikon AF-S DX 40mm f/2.8 G offers excellent resolution in the image center straight from the maximum aperture. The borders and corners struggle a bit at large aperture settings, but stopped down reach very good resolution. Since the lens is designed for a larger sensor, distortion and vignetting are no issues on Nikon 1 cameras. CAs are a bit pronounced at small apertures, but can easily be taken care of in post processing. . . . read more

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