Canon EF 70-200 f/2.8L IS II lens review by Justin VanLeeuwen at Canon Rumors: Is it worth more than twice the 70-200 f’/4L IS? Yes, if the ability to shoot at f’/2.8 across this entire range is what you need.

Canon’s trinity:16-35 f’/2.8 L, 24-70 f’/2.8 L II, and the 70-200 f’/2.8 L IS II

The lens was tested on EOS 5D Mark III, Mark II, and 7D bodies, and according to the reviewer performed admirably on every occasion:

I can’t find anything wrong with the 70-200 f’/2.8 L IS II, even the weight isn’t so significant that I whine, especially when I consider the results. If you want one of the very best telephoto zoom lenses with a consistent wide-open aperture this is, without compromise, it. If you want incredibly professional looking photographs with a sharp subject and a blurred out background with the versatility of a zoom, this is for you. Is it worth more than twice the 70-200 f’/4L IS? Yes, if the ability to shoot at f’/2.8 across this entire range is what you need. If you’re stuck shooting at . . . read more

Canon EF 24-70mm f/4 L IS USM lens review by Ken Rockwell: The Canon 24-70mm f/4 L is excellent. Its sharpness varies very little from center to edge and stays about the same with aperture changes.

Canon EF 24-70mm f/4 L IS USM review by Ken Rockwell.

The lens was tested with a Canon 5D Mark III Dslr body:

"So long as you're in focus, sharpness doesn't vary much from perfection, except by f/11, where diffraction softens the image. Hey, sorry to spare you endless boring charts, but with a lens this good, there's nothing to show other than sharp pictures under all conditions. With a lens profile on my Canon 5D Mark III or similar camera, falloff is never visible at any setting. Flare and ghosts are very well controlled, but if you push it, you will get a green dot or two. . . . read more

Canon EF-S 18-135mm f3.5-f5.6 IS STM review (tested with a Canon 7D) and score by DXO Mark: An excellent Super Zoom but no significant improvement.

the Canon EF-S 18-135mm f3.5-f5.6 IS STM offers ultra quiet continuous autofocus

"With a DxOMark Score of 12 the Canon EF-S 18-135mm f3.5-f5.6 IS STM achieves an excellent rating for an all-in-one Super Zoom lens. In terms of Sharpness the latest version just edges out its predecessor the Canon EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5 –f/5.6 IS to make it the sharpest Super Zoom on the DxOMark tested database.

Updated from a previous version to include Canon’s new Stepper Motor for silent autofocus during video capture the DxOMark Scores indicate there’s no discernable difference in optical performance between the new and old versions. There

. . . read more

Nikon ViewNX 2.7.1 Update Available for Download, adds support for the D5200, and Nikon 1 models J3 and S1, fixes a bunch of bugs.

Support for IEEE 1394 connection for the D1, D1H, and D1X has been eliminated

Modifications enabled with version 2.7.1 :

Modifications that apply to both the Windows and Macintosh versions

Support for the D5200, and Nikon 1 models J3 and S1 has been added.
The following issues with movies recorded using the Nikon 1 V2 with White Balance set to Underwater have been resolved.
Thumbnails for movies transferred with Nikon Transfer 2 using a card reader are not displayed in the thumbnail list area.
. . . read more

Nikon D5200 review by Mark Goldstein at the Photography Blog: The new Nikon D5200 may not reinvent the wheel in any way, but it is undoubtedly a great all-round DSLR that's well-suited to a lot of different users and experience levels.

The Nikon D5200 produces noise-free JPEG images at ISO 100-1600.

"The new Nikon D5200 is a solid upgrade of the previous D5100 model, with better auto-focus and metering systems, enhanced video options, slightly faster burst shooting, friendlier user interface and more resolution, although that all comes at a slight increase in price. D5100 owners won't find enough to tempt them to upgrade, but like its predecessor the D5200 still offers a compelling mix of excellent image quality, straight-forward handling and quick performance, all in a light and compact body. . . . read more

Nikon AF-S Nikkor 35mm f/1.4G Lens Review by Gary Wolstenholme at Ephotozine: Extremely sharp in the centre and highly resistant to flare but sharpness towards the edges of the frame falls behind.

Nikon AF-S Nikkor 35mm f/1.4G Review: Sharpness and Bokeh

"As this is one of Nikon's top of the range lenses, it comes with a top of the line price tag of around £1300. As the sharpness levels are so high in the centre, this may be justified if your usage suits the characteristics of this lens. What sets this lens apart is its weather-sealed magnesium construction, which helps to justify the price.

Sigma do offer an alternative in their 35mm f/1.4 DG HSM lens, which retails for around £750. The performance of this lens is comparable in many ways to the Nikon optic, so may make a worthy alternative. . . . read more

Nikon D5200 review at Cnet.uk: Details are sharp, and with 24.1 megapixels to play with there's plenty of opportunities for cropping if you want to recompose the shot in post production.

Nikon has put barely a foot wrong here. The only thing that might count against it is the price comparison with Canon's EOS 650D. Sure, Nikon has the higher pixel count at 24.1 megapixels, compared to the 650D's 18 megapixels, but when you're talking high teens and beyond, those extra pixels become less important. The EOS 650D also has a touchscreen display, and for many users that's becoming more of a draw, which is lacking on the D5200. So, it's good to see that Nikon has put so much thought into the physical layout of the hardware controls, which when combined with the speedy access it gives to the most common settings makes this a camera that's easy to learn and quick to adjust. . . . read more

Faster, Wider, Sharper! Metabones, announces the Speed Booster, the full frame lens adapter for a mirrorless camera that promises wonders, and it ain't 1st of April yet

Metabones and Caldwell Photographic introduce Speed Booster

Petersburg, VA, USA, January 14, 2013 - Metabones® and Caldwell Photographic jointly announce a revolutionary accessory called Speed Booster™, which mounts between a mirrorless camera and a SLR lens. It increases maximum aperture by 1 stop (hence its name), increases MTF and has a focal length multiplier of 0.71x. For example, the Canon EF 85mm f/1.2L II lens becomes a 59mm f/0.9 lens on a Sony NEX camera, with increased sharpness. The faster F-stop allows for shallow depth-of-field and a lower ISO setting for decreased noise. . . . read more

Canon EF 50 f/1.2L lens (mounted on a Canon 5D Mark III) review by Justin Van Leeuwen at Canon Rumors: It’s a pro lens, and with that comes the need for a pro’s experience to handle it.

The Canon 50mm f/1.2 L comes with the ES-78 lens hood

"I knew why I purchased the Canon 50mm f/1.4 over the 50mm f/1.8; the more rounded (not hexagonal) bokeh, and the slightly better build. That’s a few hundred bucks. The Canon 50mm f/1.2 L is more than four times the price of the 1.4. This is a cost/value factor we often weigh, and I have personally never once been let down by the better glass I’ve purchased, where I have with less-than-the-best. The aperture may be a bit misleading, I don’t consider f/1.2 useful for me, I have a hard time focusing that shallow of depth of field, and while a good camera body like the 1DX or . . . read more

Nikon AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.4G review (mounted on a Nikon D800E) by Ivo Freriks at Camera Stuff Review: One of the best Nikon Lenses we've tested so far.

The Nikon 50 mm 1.4G has very few problems with backlight.

"For a non-zoom lens of 50 mm (since generations already the 'standard' focal length and therefore very popular), this Nikkor is firmly priced of course. Nevertheless, with its extreme sensitivity, it also lives up to that price. The mechanical and optical qualities are very high. The resolution is exceptionally good, and with the exception of some vignetting at large apertures, there are actually no lens errors. The lens is large enough for you to wrap your hand around when shooting. On our wish list for the Nikon 50 mm 1.4G is only vibration reduction. . . . read more

Mike Lowe at Pocket Lint, about the Nikon D5200: Same sharpness issues as some D7000 models experienced?

Amid the madness of last week's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Pocket-lint was able to prise away a final firmware version of the Nikon D5200 for an extended play. The glitzy red devil has a brand new 24-megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor at its core, but does it drop photographic bangers or has the increase in resolution caused it to bomb? It seems we've stumbled upon an issue with our particular D5200 sample: a closer inspection of shots reveals they're just not as sharp as they ought to be. . . . read more

Best of Show: Top 5 Digital Cameras from CES 2013 by Laura Hicks at Digital Camera Review

the best cameras of ces 2013

"#1 Fuji X100S One word - Luxury. This camera is a beautiful. With a retro camera body that looks almost identical to the X100, the X100S is the epitome of a luxury camera. An advanced 16.3MP APS-C X-Trans CMOS II Sensor and improved EXR Processor II make this camera the fastest autofocus in its class. The X100S has a fixed 23mm f2 lens. But this beauty comes at a price. The camera is expected to be released in the spring of 2013 and available for around $1300. I bet your first reaction was, "Wow, that's a lot of money for a fixed lens compact camera." And I will admit . . . read more

Tamron SP 90 mm f/2.8 Di MACRO 1:1 VC USD lens review at LensTip: Sensational image quality in the frame centre up from the maximum relative aperture, very good image quality on the edge of the frame on APS-C/DX and full frame and negligible CA.

 the Tamron SP 90 mm f/2.8 Di MACRO 1:1 VC USD

"Looking at the list of pros and cons, published above, and comparing the results of other lenses, tested by us in particular categories it is pretty transparent that all 90–105 mm stabilized macro lenses keep a similar, very high level. It doesn’t mean that there are no differences between them. The best performance seems to be presented by the Canon 2.8/100L IS USM which in many categories topped the list and had practically no slip-ups. Right behind it there are the Tamron and the Nikkor and the Sigma fares the worst. . . . read more

Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm f/4G ED VR Lens review by at SLR Gear: Up until now, to get into the 70-200mm range, you didn't have a decision. Now you can save $1,000 and get the smaller, lighter lens - except it isn't quite as good as the 70-200mm f/2.8.

The Nikon 70-200mm ƒ/4G VR is relatively small and light.

"The 70-200mm ƒ/4G VR offered some excellent results on the sub-frame D7000, producing tack-sharp results when used wide open at ƒ/4, at every focal length save 200mm. At 200mm the lens has a harder time keeping up, producing moderately sharp images at ƒ/4; stopping down to ƒ/5.6 however, will get back to tack-sharp.

The vast resolution of the D800e's 36-megapixel sensor wasn't as kind to the 70-200mm ƒ/4. It provided moderately . . . read more

Ken Rockwell reviews the Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-20mm f/4.0 G ED VR Lens: It works great! It's about time Nikon made some reasonable tele zooms for digital, instead of just the f/2.8 pigs from back before we had today's hyper ISOs.

sharper than Nikon's 24-70/2.8 and about the same as Nikon's 70-200/2.8 VR II

A few notes: Ken tested this lens mounted on a Nikon D800E. Also, it is rather sad to see the 'Made in Japan" engraving go away from even high end Nikkor lenses, it kinda takes away some of the magic. 

"I don't bother with f/2.8 tele zooms when shooting digital. I use them only when shooting 35mm, otherwise, they're too heavy. f/2.8 lenses went out with 35mm film, which only went to about ISO 100 before it started looking ratty. With digital, f/4 and f/5.6 are more than fast enough. It's high time Nikon finally got with the program to make a practical tele zoom like this again so we don't have to hump the f/2.8 beasts. . . . read more

Nikon D5200 review by Nik Rawlinson at Cnet.uk: Focusing speed aside, it is a great choice for the all-round, ambitious consumer.

Nikon has put barely a foot wrong here. The only thing that might count against it is the price comparison with Canon's EOS 650D. Sure, Nikon has the higher pixel count at 24.1 megapixels, compared to the 650D's 18 megapixels, but when you're talking high teens and beyond, those extra pixels become less important.

The EOS 650D also has a touchscreen display, and for many users that's becoming more of a draw, which is lacking on the D5200. So, it's good to see that Nikon has put so much thought into the physical layout of the hardware  . . . read more

Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm f/4G ED VR Lens review by Nick Delvin at the Luminous Landscape: This lens is very good, showing what modern optical design can achieve, it is pleasing to use and the cost is bearable, though by no means a bargain.

Even at f/4, where the f/2.8 lens should have an advantage, I have been able to detect very little difference.  At 70 and 200mm I thought I saw a teeny, eensy, teeny, weeny little advantage in contrast for the f/2.8…..at 2:1 magnification on screen.  And no, I’m not reproducing those tests here because that kind of pixel abuse is not to be promoted <grin>.   The bokeh, or out of focus rendering, of the lens was just fine.  Not anything like a 75mm AA Summicron, but totally acceptable for an f/4 zoom.

I also wouldn't hesitate to us this lens for studio portraiture. It focuses quickly and silently (as expected) and performs as well as anyone would want on a portrait-shoot, throughout its range.

The f/4 lens did seem to have a slightly  warmer colour reproduction than the f/2.8 version – though again only very slightly. . . . read more

Canon EF 35mm f/2 lens review (tested on a 5D Mark III) by Ken Rockwell: This 35/2 is smaller, lighter and less expensive than any other fixed Canon 35mm AF lens. It's also just as sharp, with less flare, very slightly less distortion and better sunstars.

The Canon 35mm f/2 is optically superb and handles very well.

"This said, the Canon 35mm f/2 is among the sharpest wide lenses I've tested, just like the 35mm f/1.4 L (1998-) and new 35mm f/2 IS (2012-). The only differences between these and the 24-70/2.8 L II is if you're looking in the far corners on full-frame, in which case, this original 35/2 is slightly less sharp than the others wide-open, but the same stopped down, and the same throughout 95% of the rest of the image that matters.

This 35/2 is extraordinarily sharp and contrasty, even at f/2. Throughout 95% of the image, there is no difference between f/2 and stopped down, as seen on a 22MP 5D Mark III at the test range at infinity. As one stops down to f/8, the . . . read more

Sigma 35mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM Lens Review by Bryan Carnathan at The Digital Picture: The best lens Sigma has ever made?

"The Sigma 35mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM Lens, like all of Sigma's best lenses, uses HSM (Hyper Sonic Motor) AF. Autofocusing is internal and very quiet, making a light shhhh sound with some clicks being audible to the photographer if shooting in a quiet environment. Autofocusing is quick, though my perception is that the Canon EF 35mm f/1.4 L Lens focuses slightly faster when using both side-by-side.

Autofocus accuracy is of course paramount when making use of the great f/1.4 image quality with its shallow . . . read more

Canon EOS 6D Review by Mark Goldstein at the Photography Blog: The new 20 megapixel sensor in conjunction with the Digic 5+ processor results in seriously impressive low-light performance, with an almost noise-free range of ISO 50-6400.

"The new 20 megapixel sensor in conjunction with the Digic 5+ processor results in seriously impressive low-light performance, with an almost noise-free range of ISO 50-6400 and perfectly usable 12800 and 25600 settings. The video side of things is also excellent, with an accessible interface, manual exposure, better control of sound and cutting-edge compression rates. We would have liked to have seen an articulated LCD screen for easier composition, and the auto-focus system for movies is still decidedly clunky when compared to mirrorless cameras, . . . read more

DXO Mark tests the new Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm f/4G ED VR, finds it to be a remarkably good performer.

DXO Mark tests the new Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm f/4G ED VR

"The Nikon AF-S 70-200mm f/4G ED VR shows itself to be a remarkably good performer. If you are a Nikon user and are in the market for a 70-200mm focal range lens, it makes a great case for serious consideration with high scores in all lens test metrics and a price that is much lower than expected for the performance on offer. . . . read more

Canon 6D vs 5D Mark III and Nikon D600 comparison by Ron Martinsen: From an image quality standpoint these are all excellent cameras that are sure to please at their full range of ISO’s – especially when using in-camera JPEG’s.

D600 24-70mm f/2.8 @ 24 mm, 1/200, ISO 25,600

"None of these cameras are speed demons, and while the 5D Mark III is the fastest, the buffer on the Mark III is only a couple RAW files bigger than the 6D. As a result, I wouldn’t really classify either Canon body as a sports body, but both – especially in JPEG only mode – will be good enough to capture some basic action shots of kids running around. The AF system of the 5D Mark III blows away the 6D, so if you are going to shoot moving subjects it’s going to give you the best results over the 6D and D600. . . . read more

Canon EF 35mm f/2 IS USM lens review by Ken Rockwel: It is very sharp, but not much better than Canon's older and much cheaper 35mm f/2 lens. If you need something really better, go with the EF 35mm f/1.4 L Lens.

The Canon 35mm f/2 IS is made to typical consumer standards.

"The Canon 35mm f/2 IS is among the sharpest wide lenses I've tested, just like the 35mm f/1.4 L (1998-) and original 35mm f/2 (1990-). The only differences between these and the 24-70/2.8 L II is if you're looking in the far corners on full-frame wide-open, in which case, the original 35/f2 is slightly less sharp, and all the rest are also about the same, with this 35/2 IS and the 24-70/2.8 L II being very slightly better in the corners wide-open.

This 35/2 IS is extraordinarily sharp and contrasty, even at f/2. Throughout most of the image, there is little or no . . . read more

Canon 24-70mm f/4.0 L IS lens Resolution Tests by Roger Cicala at Lens Rentals: This is a good lens, but I at the price point I’d probably prefer the f/2.8 of the Tamron VC to the new Canon’s f/4.

"Obviously this hasn’t told us a thing about autofocus accuracy, bokeh, or a dozen other things that have to be considered when choosing a lens. Just like you, I’ll be waiting for more complete reviews to tell us about that.

On the basis of this information, though, I’m . . .  well, I don’t know what I am. This is a good lens, but I at the price point I’d probably prefer the f/2.8 of the Tamron VC to the new Canon’s f/4. The macro feature is nice and will certainly pull some

. . . read more

Nikon's AF-S Nikkor 28mm f/1.8G lens gets a stellar DXO Mark score: The Nikkor 28mm f/1.8G is a highly competitive lens. It is well priced for the quality it offers and for a prime wide-angle lens the optical performance is, quite simply, staggering.

verall, the Nikkor 28mm f/1.8G provides the best results of these three lenses.

"The Nikon AF-S Nikkor 28mm f/1.8G is a highly competitive lens. It is very well priced for the quality it offers and for a prime wide-angle lens the optical performance is, quite simply, staggering. Whatever genre of photography you enjoy, from landscapes to travel, reportage or architecture, the 28mm f/1.8G will ensure you capture the scene as accurately as possible. If you’re looking for an FX-fit wide-angle lens to mount on your Nikon FX camera, the 28mm f/1.8G represents not just the ‘best’ choice in terms of optical performance, but also the ‘smart’ choice because the performance per . . . read more

Canon EF 28mm f2.8 IS USM goes to the DXO mark shop, comes out pretty unscathed: This Canon EF 28mm f2.8 IS USM is a very good lens, if you are looking for a 28mm lens then really this is the only one that stands out.

Canon EF 28mm f2.8 IS USM vs Canon EF 24mm f2.8 IS USM vs Canon EF 28mm f1.8 USM

"Among Canon’s own lenses the EF 28mm f2.8 IS USM can hold its head high, it performs very well, so is it worth looking further afield too? Carl Zeiss also produces a 28mm lens in Canon fit, their Distagon f2 ZE. Without image stabilization or auto focus this is a lens that needs to perform significantly better to justify costing twice as much: It doesn’t, it actually matches the Canon virtually point for point, it’s only benefit apparently being its wider aperture. However Canon’s image . . . read more

Canon EOS 6D review by Michael Hession at Gizmodo: The perks of a full-frame sensor in a slimmed-down body, at a fraction of the price, but video quality is a huge step backwards.

The 6D is smaller than the 5D Mark III, and about the same size as the 7D.

"Ever use a Canon DSLR? It's like that. You won't notice anything different here aside from the altered control layout. Versus the 5D MK3, the 6D has a simpler autofocus system, with 11 points instead of 61 points. But it's still fast and accurate. The 6D sports a single SDXC card slot, as opposed to the CF slots of its older siblings. The other differences are quite minor. . . . read more

A super-rare Nikon Nikkor 10mm OP f5.6 fisheye lens up for grabs for $49.000 on Ebay. Pop Photo explains the what and why of this remarkable lens.

"This lens was only produced by Nikon for eight years, from 1968 to 1976, and even then was extremely uncommon — fewer than 1,000 were ever made (possibly even much fewer, one website cites just 78 were produced.) Not only that, but the 10mm was a specially designed lens that uses Orthographic Projection (OP) rather than Equidistant Projection, making it one of the first SLR lenses to do so. Perhaps even more importantly, it's allegedly the first aspherical SLR lens ever produced. . . . read more

Michael Stringer checks how the the Canon 6D works out for a wedding, compares it to the 5D Mark III and the Fujifilm XE-1: Makes a brilliant backup to a 5D Mark III for wedding photographers.

Canon 6D EF85mm f/1.2 at f1.4 1/125 250 iso

"Canon sensors have lagged behind Sony’s (and therefore Nikon’s) sensors in recent years regarding dynamic range (the limits of luminance range between black and white in an image). This deficiency might be seen as a problem – especially when photographing a bride and groom in their customary colour scheme. However given a correctly metered shot there should be no problem. I rarely find dynamic range an issue but there are occasions when trying to retrieve highlights or shadows from a very ‘dynamic’ image is limited. . . . read more

Canon EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Lens Review by Gary Wolstenholme at Ephotozine: Descent but not exceptional, and very expensive when not sold as part of a kit.

The old Canon 18-135mm IS USM lens reincarnated with a stepper motor, more suitable for video recording where smoothness and silence during AF operation is a prerequisite:

"At maximum aperture and 18mm sharpness is already excellent in the centre of the frame, with the clarity towards the edges of the frame being not too far behind. Peak sharpness is achieved between f/4 and f/5.6 for this focal length, and sharpness is excellent across the frame at these apertures. . . . read more

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